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Sony PlayStation 4: All you need to know

Video GamesGuides
, 28 Jan 2013Guides
Sony PlayStation 4: All you need to know

The hotly anticipated Sony PlayStation 4 has been the subject of intense speculation and rumour across the Internet. The most legitimate of which have already been covered by ITProPortal, but with a prospective unveiling rumoured to be as soon as next month every new detail leaked is likely to be more representative of the actual product. So bookmark this article as your all-in-one destination for the PS4 - or should I say PlayStation Orbis - as it will be updated with the most current and credible news on what to expect from Sony’s next console.

22 February, 2013

Sony has officially announced the PlayStation 4, but will it succeed? That's the question Stuart Andrews endeavours to address in his latest blog, while in other analysis, we take a more detailed look at the PlayStation 4's specs. It's fair to say we're pretty darned excited about the PS4 right now, so stay tuned for more great content - or why not migrate to our Xbox 720 rumour and news hub to see what the competition has in store?

21 February, 2013

Something kind of important occurred last night - Sony officially launched the PlayStation 4. ITProPortal's Riyad Emeran was up burning the midnight oil to bring you an in-depth report of the event, which saw the Japanese firm show off its new DualShock 4 controller and offer an early peek at some of the top titles coming to the next-gen system. However, Sony left a fair few questions unanswered, making a Sony PlayStation 4 FAQ one of the first things we set about writing after the big announcement. Follow the link to find out everything we know about the PS4 at this stage, including our tips regarding release date and pricing.

18 February, 2013

A photo of what appears to be Sony's revamped DualShock controller has hit the web, just days before the company is expected to take the wraps off its next-gen console. The big revelation here is the apparent integration of a touchpad into the middle of the unit, so follow the link for a speculative first glimpse of the next PlayStation controller. 

16 February, 2013

Sony intends to offer technology that will allow users to stream PlayStation 3 games on its forthcoming PlayStation 4 console, according to the latest speculation. 

7 February, 2013

With the PS4 looking increasingly likely to break cover at Sony's PlayStation Meeting on 20 February, attention is starting to shift to the console's pricing and availability. According to a respected Osaka-based newspaper, the PlayStation 4 will retail from ¥40,000 when it is released to consumers later in the year. That figure works out at around $400, €300, or £250 based on today's exchange rates. Of course, while $400 seems to be a fair asking price for the US market, we don't really think Sony will benevolently bestow its next-generation console on us Brits for a mere £250, so consider these early price indications as guides rather than gospel.

1 February, 2013

PlayStation fans should pencil in 20 February into their calendars as the possible unveiling of the Orbis. Sony has sent out invitations to this year's PlayStation Meeting where it promises that attendees will "see the future". The venue is purported to be New York with the event expected to be live-streamed from 18:00 EST (23:00 GMT).   

23 January, 2013

Kotaku claims to have gotten its hands on a 90 page PDF which details the contents of Orbis dev kits issued for January 2013. The specifications mined from the document corroborates claims that the next-gen console will feature an eight-core CPU, in the form of four dual-core AMD64 "Bulldozer" processors, alongside an AMD R10xx GPU, 160GB HDD, Blu-ray optical drive, two Ethernet ports, four USB 3.0 ports as well as a few HDMI and optical audio outputs thrown in for good measure.

The specs do seem to be analogous to Digital Foundry's assertions (read below), bearing in mind that dev kits are designed to replicate the performance of a product but may not be representative of its end state, since it's still in-development. This is demonstrated by Kotaku's contention that the dev kits are compatible with both the Sixaxis and DualShock 3 controllers. At face value this refutes earlier reports that Sony could be retiring its DualShock controller series with the advent of the Orbis. However, Kotaku went on to report that a new controller is under construction, internally dubbed the "Orbis Development Tool", and is expected to feature a touchscreen – further corroborating previous controller speculation.

18 January, 2013

Digital Foundry put forward the lofty claim that it had a full rundown of the PlayStation Orbis’ system specifications. The technology focused arm of Eurogamer conducted in-depth speculative analysis on the future-console, which may hold a few nuggets of truth. Of course all of these details are yet to be confirmed so feel free to take the following with a pinch of salt.

The next PlayStation will purportedly run on AMD’s, currently in-development, eight-core “Jaguar” CPU clocked at 1.6GHz. The new processor will supposedly be paired with a Radeon HD GPU that has been likened to the Radeon 7970M in regards to power consumption and die-size. The Orbis GPU will likely feature 18 “Graphics Core Next” compute units and is expected to run at 800MHz.  

The deep analysis does throw up some mystery, as the Orbis is also speculated to consist of a mythical “compute” component that is designed to aid in CPU busywork, like physics calculations. Its memory set-up is expected to consist of 4GB GDDR5 with 512MB reserved for the operating system.

Digital Foundry went on to reaffirm claims that the core silicon is codenamed “Liverpool” and will house all the aforementioned elements, reducing the overall rate of power consumption as a consequence. This incredible feat could be possible via AMD’s aforementioned Jaguar tech, which supposedly allows for an overall CPU component to be as little as 75-80mm. The all-in-one processor may also provide significant savings in regards to production as Sony will only need to manufacture one chip instead of the multiple components seen in the PS3.  

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