Samsung Galaxy Note 2 clone shows how far white box market has gone

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If you look really hard on the dozens of booths at Mobile World Congress, you will be able to see one device that looks a lot like the Samsung's Galaxy Note 2, a phone tablet that was launched only six months ago.

I briefly played with such a product today and was surprised by its quality and what, for a suggested retail price of around $300 (£200), it offers on the table.

Like its better known rival, it has a glossy white finish with a silver bezel. As expected its bezel is extremely thin and a rectangular-shaped button adorns its facia.

It comes with a quad-core system-on-chip, the Mediatek MTK6589, clocked at 1.6GHz with a PowerVR SGX graphics solution.

Other features include a massive 5.7in display with a 1,280 x 800 pixels resolution, 512MB of RAM, 4GB onboard storage with a microSD card slot, a front facing VGA camera, a 5-megapixel rear one, a stylus and Android 4.1 Ice Cream Sandwich.

The build quality of such products has improved tremendously over the past few years with memories of resistive displays and single-core products almost banned forever.