Dell Latitude E6430s vs Latitude E6430u: Classic vs Ultrabook preview

If you're looking for a business laptop that's not too big or heavy, Dell has two options in its Latitude line. The 6430u is an Ultrabook and the E6430s is a traditional notebook. Today we will take a closer look at both.

They look very different. The Latitude E6430s is bigger and heavier than the 6430u, and looks like a typical, compact business laptop. It has state-of-the-art hardware though, including an Ivy Bridge processor.

The E6430u looks a little bit like the E6430s, but the stylistic differences are clear even though they're related. The color scheme is different. The Dell Latitude E6430u is thin but feels solid. Both have a rubber-like finish, the 6430s has it around the keyboard only, but the Ultrabook version has it all over the place.

You expect the Latitude E6430s to have more connectors, and it does have a docking port which the E6430u does not have. The E6430u does have a WiGi adapter, which lets you establish high-speed wireless connections with peripheral devices. Dell does not yet have the dock for it, however.

The 6430u actually has one USB 3.0 port (shared with eSATA) the E6430s doesn't have, in addition to the two USB 2.0 ports. Both have memory card readers.

The E6430s also has an ExpressCard 34 slot, a SmartCard slot, and a built-in DVD burner. It's possible to remove it and instead put an extra 3-cell battery in its place for improved battery life. Other connectors include ethernet, HDMI and VGA. It's Mini HDMI, even though there seems to be enough room for a full-size version.

The sleeker 6430u does have a full-size HDMI port, and unlike the super-sleek Ultrabooks it does have an ethernet port and normal VGA. You can also get an optional smartcard reader and a fingerprint reader. Business features include vPro and TPM. Both models have an extensive BIOS with lots of management options. They come with Windows 8 Pro 64-bit, but you can also instead get Windows 7 which still is the standard for business users.

You can read the rest of this review on hardware.info.