Confirmed: New Nokia Lumia 1020 banks on 41-megapixel camera

Nokia has this afternoon unveiled its latest flagship smartphone, the Lumia 1020, which ventures into unknown photographic territory for a mobile phone.

The Lumia 1020’s camera boasts a second generation 41-megapixel sensor with Nokia’s PureView technology, previously seen on its unsuccessful 808 PureView handset.

The Finnish firm will be desperate for the high-end snapper to seduce more users this time around, as the rest of the Lumia 1020’s specifications point to a capable, if fairly run-of-the-mill Windows Phone 8 model.

Following swiftly on the heels of the Lumia 920, and even more recently the Lumia 925 and 928, the new Lumia 1020 sports a 4.5in AMOLED display with 1280x768 resolution, a 1.5GHz Snapdragon S4 processor in the engine room, 2GB RAM, 32GB internal memory with 7GB free SkyDrive cloud storage, a 2000mAh battery, wireless charging, LTE connectivity, and a 1.2-megapixel front camera for those selfies.

But the eggs have been thrown right into the photographic basket here. Packed into that 41-megapixel sensor are leading Zeiss optics in six physical lenses, plus optical image stabilisation helping to produce clear pictures in low light settings.

While the Lumia 1020 can capture 34-megapixel and 38-megapixel image files, the phone will also save a 5-megapixel version of the shot for those who want to share less cumbersome snaps on the likes of Twitter or Facebook.

Further harnessing the hardware set-up is the new Nokia Pro Camera application, which "makes it easy for anyone to take professional quality images.” This will include some pre-installed image-capturing tutorials for the novice user.

Unveiling the phone at a New York press event today, Nokia CEO Stephen Elop talked up the company's history of innovation when it comes to photos. "This passion for pictures is something that Nokia recognised very, very early on. We filed our first imaging patent in 1994; the first of 450 imaging patents we hold today," he said.

"The Nokia 1020 will change how you shoot, how you create, and how you share pictures forever," PC Mag quotes Elop.