HP releases freemium IT services cloud portal

Hewlett-Packard has launched a cloud-based service solution that it promises will help to allow IT organisations to become service brokers and provide self-service capabilities to end users.

The HP Propel service will be available in both free and paid-for versions with a trio of software-as-a-service [SaaS] applications consisting of an IT self-service portal, service catalogues and Open Service Exchange.

HP’s free version of Propel for desktops and mobile devices is made up of a standard service catalogue as well as a Knowledge Management collaboration product to accelerate user self-service and IT news feeds delivered via RSS.

The paid-for version of HP Propel has an enhanced catalogue in addition to advanced authentication methods like single sign-on and access to the extended Propel Knowledge Management solution. IT organisations are able to integrate on-site service management solutions using the HP-hosted Propel Service Exchange.

HP is hoping the solution will bring down administration costs and push speeds up without being detrimental to the service delivery itself, which will in fact improve. It will also allow IT organisations to deliver an experience geared towards the consumer whilst at the same time maintaining security and control at an enterprise level.

E.ON is one firm that is already signed up to the service and it has helped them to reduce various service catalogues containing 10,000 items into one catalogue containing 1,000 items and thus reduced manual service desk activities by 15 per cent.

“As our business becomes more complex, we believe that open framework and consumerised user experience are central to enabling our self-service strategy aimed to improve performance and cost control,” said Edgar Aschenbrenner, chief information officer, E.ON.

“The implementation of HP Propel service portal is a key step towards transforming our IT organization into a strictly service oriented multi-supplier environment,” he added.

HP Propel will be released in the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and Africa in January with Asia Pacific and Japanese markets gaining access to the service in March.