Hands on with the Nokia X: Is this the best value Android smartphone range out there?

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It would be easy to think that only flashy, premium handsets like the recently launched Samsung Galaxy S5 are capable of causing a stir at big events like MWC.

In fact, one of the show's most eagerly anticipated devices is a budget smartphone, the Nokia X.

Related: A closer look at the Nokia X budget Android smartphone

I ankled over to the Finnish company's stand to have a fiddle with the new product, which marks the firm's first foray into Android territory.

Not that it's immediately obvious. While based on Android open source code, the Nokia skin is about as distant from the stock OS as I've seen and there are still heavy elements of Windows Phone - specifically tiled app icons. Dive a bit deeper into things like the settings interface, though, and the Android heritage is more noticeable.

The Nokia X is actually three different devices – the 4in Nokia X proper, the larger screened 5in Nokia XL, and the 4in Nokia X+, which will feature improved RAM and additional storage.

There's not really a lot to say about the devices on the spec front: the Nokia X range features WVGA displays, 5-megapixel primary cameras, and (except in the case of Nokia X+), a dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon processor clocked at 1GHz and augmented by 512MB of RAM.

But that's to be expected at this absurdly low price point: the Nokia X will cost just €89 (£73), the Nokia X+ and its slightly beefier specs will run at €99 (£81), the large-screen Nokia XL will be the most expensive device in the company's burgeoning Android family at a heady €109 (£90).

Personally, I found navigating the handsets to be slightly less smooth than other devices I've played with and a bit confusing at times in terms of layout, but that's largely a case of me being a premium smartphone addict.

All things considered, the devices seemed like good value, with only the gaudy bright colours and chunky plastic chassis (the Nokia X is a whopping 10.4mm thick; the XL is even bigger at 10.8mm) really leaving a sour taste in my mouth.

With its new X range, Nokia feels like it is going back to - or, rather, updating - its 'brick phone' roots. That's not necessarily such a bad thing and the Nokia X handsets look worth serious consideration for punters after a cheap smartphone with basic capabilities.