Tim Berners-Lee hosts "Ask Me Anything" Reddit session at 1900 GMT

Today it is likely that a certain media storm will have brought to your attention the fact that the World Wide Web has turned twenty five. A quarter of a century after Tim Berners-Lee invented the "vague, but exciting" technology at CERN, he will be stepping into the online spotlight this evening by hosting an Ask Me Anything session on Reddit.

The AMA session takes place tonight, 12 March, at 1900 GMT.

Excited users have already posted on Reddit a number of questions for the revolutionary entrepreneur, including his thoughts on governments undermining Internet freedom, whether he's a supporter of Bitcoin and whether if someone had patented the web in the beginning it would have changed the fates of global behemoths like Google and Facebook.

The furore around the World Wide Web's birthday should come as no surprise. As human beings we are fascinated by birthdays; we use them to measure our successes, how far we've come and what choices have brought us to where we are now.

For example, if no one celebrated birthdays, we would not have Christmas. By not celebrating Jesus's birthday, we would have no Downton Abbey Christmas specials to watch in late December. The "Happy Birthday" song would be erased from the Guinness Book of Records as the most frequently sung song in the world, only to be replaced by Adele's "Someone Like You." Most hideously, if everybody's birthdays were struck off it would make using Google Calender very difficult for planning your diary at work.

But I digress. The point is that today marks a monumental moment in modern history that has gone on to define how we interact with each other, how businesses relate to their customers and how we glean information from the world around us.

As we barrel towards a hyper-connected future dominated by smart cities and the Internet of Things, the name "World Wide Web" could not be more apt. So what better way to look forward to this new society than by questioning the man who kick started it all twenty five years ago? You have two hours to ready your questions – when you're ready, post them on the online Reddit session here.