Samsung ordered to pay Apple just $119.6m in $2.2bn patent case

Samsung will pay Apple $119.6 million [£71 million] after a federal court found it guilty of flouting two patents in the latest ruling of a bitterly long patent fight between two of the world’s largest technology firms.

Related: Google lashes out at rival Apple by funding Samsung in legal patent battle

A jury in San Jose, California delivered the verdict to the federal court and unanimously agreed that Samsung had infringed various patents related to smartphone features, though the settlement amount is far less than the $2.2 billion [£1.3 billion] that Apple had originally sought.

"Though this verdict is large by normal standards, it is hard to view this outcome as much of a victory for Apple,'' said Brian Love, a Santa Clara University law professor. "This amount is less than 10% of the amount Apple requested and probably doesn't surpass by too much the amount Apple spent litigating this case.''

Samsung has, in this case, claimed that Apple’s real beef is with Google and given that four of the five patents involved relate to the Android operating system run on the devices it could well be right.

To further compound Apple’s disappointment Samsung was awarded $158,400 [£93,911] in damages as it found that the former had infringed some of Samsung’s patents that related to camera use and video transmission – Samsung originally seeking $6 million [£3.55 million] in damages.

Both companies will push for a sales ban on each other’s devices and Love, as well as other experts, added that this happening is extremely unlikely.

"So far Apple has been unsuccessful at doing so and, without a sales ban, this case is unlikely to move the needle on the larger battle between Apple and Android," Love added.

Related: Patent war rages on as Apple and Samsung fail to negotiate

This result comes two years after a jury ruled that Samsung had used Apple’s technology in its devices and ordered it to pay $930 million [£550 million] in damages – a verdict that Samsung is still railing against.