Google I/O 2014 keynote as it happened: Reaction, pictures and analysis

It's that time of year again. Google's annual developer conference is set to kick off at 9am PDT (5pm BST) on 25 June, and ITProPortal will be providing live, minute-by-minute coverage of the opening keynote.

As usual, much of the technology world is driving itself mad with anticipation, and for good reason too. After all, we're expecting a mouth-watering line-up of new products and announcements.

So much so that we can't really say what we're most looking forward to seeing. Android 5.0 Lollipop? A new Nexus 10 tablet? Android TV? Android Wear smartwatches? The list is long and pretty spectacular.

Conveniently, Google Glass was officially released in the UK this week, so we're definitely also expecting some news on that front. A Nest-themed answer to Apple's HomeKit announcement is also potentially on the cards, along with a whole host of updates and revamps.

Unfortunately, the launch of a new Nexus-branded smartphone is unlikely (since the current one only came out in October), but we're still keeping our fingers crossed.

Stick with us for all the action and get in touch via the comments box at the bottom of the page or through Twitter and Facebook.

Sign up to our mailing list via the form below to make sure you don't miss any of our live coverage in the future.

  • 26 June
  • 10:54

    Speaking of which...

  • 10:33

    Rob Enderle was more than impressed with Google's latest big show, singling out the mobile gaming, TV, wearables and automotive developments for particular praise.

  • 10:31

    Just received an official statement from HTC about Android L: "HTC is excited about the new features in Android L and we can't wait to share them with our customers. We are committed to updating our flagship HTC One family as fast as possible. We will begin rolling out updates to the HTC One (M8) and HTC One (M7) in regions worldwide within 90 days of receiving final software from Google, followed shortly thereafter by other One family members and select devices."

  • 09:31

    Here's a short recap of everything that went down last night.

  • 25 June
  • 19:47

    Stick with ITProPortal over the next couple of days as we bring you more updates from San Francisco. There's always extra tasty tidbits to come out of the show that you won't want to miss.

  • 19:46

    We particularly loved smartwatch voice control integration with Android Auto, Google's answer to Apple's CarPlay.

  • 19:45

    This conference also looks to be a beacon of hope for the much-criticised smartwatch. The Google clever clogs were keen to show us a multitude of scenarios where having a smartwatch will come in handy - and the Moto 360 especially stood wrist and elbows above the rest.

  • 19:43

    Still, looks like smartphone integration is a big focus this year. Pretty much every bit of that was explaining how Android can work with other Google platforms like Chrome - that's big news.

  • 19:41

  • 19:41

    Well, no talk of Android 4.5 or 5.0 *very sad trombone*

  • 19:40

    And with that, the opening keynote wraps.

  • 19:40

    So that's two watches and a piece of cardboard. Happy faces all round.

  • 19:39

    Oh wait. No, he was just setting the scene to announce each conference attendee will be getting either the LG G Watch or the Samsung Gear Live. AND the lucky things will get a Moto 360 as soon as it comes available - cue quite possibly the biggest cheer so far.

  • 19:38

    Looks like Pichai is gearing up to give all attendees a carboard box.... might not necessarily be the shiny bit of new kit they were expecting.

  • 19:38

  • 19:38

    That's 2.5x payout growth year on year. Nice.

  • 19:37

    Since last year's I/O, Google has "paid out more than $5bn to developers on Google Play"

  • 19:37

    Pichai takes the stage again.

  • 19:36

    Happily though, the saved games feature of Play Games is being extended, so you can resume more easily across devices. This is even more important as Android TV steps up to run games.

  • 19:35

    Sad face.

  • 19:35

    That's funny, because Play Games was first announced last year, but it hasn't exactly lit the world on fire.

  • 19:35

  • 19:35

    According to Powers, it's the "fastest growing mobile game network of all time."

  • 19:34

    Now on to Google Play Games.

  • 19:34

  • 19:34

    Interestingly Nike has announced its support for Google Fit.

  • 19:33

    Hmmm, Google Fit APIs allow apps to share your fitness activity. Only with your explicit permission, but still....

  • 19:33

    Clearly aggregating fitness data is a big preoccupation of tech companies this year.

  • 19:32

    It sounds like this is yet another platform to unify fitness data, much like Apple's HealthKit recently announced at WWDC.

  • 19:32

    It will have a single set of APIs.

  • 19:31

    But now a preview of the Google Fit platform.

  • 19:31

    In case you're interested, Appurify will continue to be cross-platform on iOS and Android, and available as a freemium service.

  • 19:31

    Either way, Powers says Appurify is going to help app makers do cross-platform testing, global device support, and connectivity simulations.

  • 19:30

    Though actually, they didn't specifically say "bought." She said that they'd "joined" with Appurify - perhaps this is just a partnership? Unclear.

  • 19:30

  • 19:29

    Google has just bought Appurify - is its wallet completely bottomless?!?!

  • 19:29

  • 19:29

    She's going to talk about developing apps, distributing them, and how to make money.

  • 19:28

    Ellie Powers has now taken to the stage to talk about Google Play, which is pretty understandable considering that she's PM of it.

  • 19:27

    Spot the difference...

  • 19:26

    Urz is back, and he's getting into the spirit of things by donning a football shirt.

  • 19:26

    Basically, we're seeing how easy it is to build cloud apps, how easy it is to test and refine them, and of course deploy them to the world.

  • 19:26

    The algorithms are attempting to track the sentiment about Brazil and Uruguay, showing positive and negative swings based on a botched call from the referee.

  • 19:25

    This huge emphasis on coding is clearly Google's way showing that its programming language is worthy of note. This is a response to Apple's celebration of its new programming language.

  • 19:24

    He's demonstrating a stream of code that analyses a stream of tweets relating to the World Cup.

  • 19:23

    Ok, this guy isn't a work experience student - he's about two decades beyond that and VERY good at coding.

  • 19:23

    "No no, that's just the work experience student."

  • 19:22

    "Crap! Eric Schmidt is going to be sitting in on our Monday morning meeting!"

  • 19:22

    Clearly, Google employee 13,909 has a rather coincidental namesake.

  • 19:21

    Wait a minute. This isn't THE Eric Schmidt.

  • 19:21

    But now it's time for the big dog - Eric Schmidt.

  • 19:20

    Urz highlights how ingesting code rapidly is difficult, requiring lots of different tech.

  • 19:19

  • 19:19

    But now let's go from coding to data and analytics.

  • 19:16

    Cloud debugging is a new tool. If you code, this could be revolutionary.

  • 19:14

  • 19:13

    Meanwhile, things have got really technical on stage. We're deep into the coding woods with a live demo on Google's Developers Console.

  • 19:12

    Clearly this guy isn't happy about Google partnering with Boston Dynamics. Though the company did recently announce that it had dropped all its government contracts...

  • 19:12

  • 19:10

    Could hear him a bit more clearly this time since Urz is looking pretty ruffled and has stopped talking. He's yelling about Google building machines that kill people.

  • 19:10

    Oh dear - another protestor has made it in....

  • 19:10

    Hopefully this Moore's Law will continue until Google Cloud becomes next to free. Imagine the potential of unlimited, online, storage for free!

  • 19:09

  • 19:08

    "Beyond the technology, we lead the market in terms of price" As hardware price drops, so Google will drop its price. This is "Moore's Law" in its most cost-effective form.

  • 19:07

    He's talking all things Google Cloud. Google now offers compute options for remote execution.

  • 19:07

  • 19:06

    Urz Hotzele has taken to stage, a man who is officially Google employee number eight.

  • 19:06

  • 19:05

    Seeing some inspirational developer stories here, a team of middle school devs (incidentally, an all female team) who wrote an app for a blind student to get around the school. Seriously amazing stuff, and they receive a well deserved round of applause for their work.

  • 19:02

    Time for another video showing how developers can take advantage of these platforms.

  • 19:02

  • 19:01

    67 of the top 100 start-ups have "gone Google." What that means, we're not sure.

  • 19:00

  • 19:00

    Fingers crossed that we're actually going to get thrown a big bone sometime soon. Is Google saving its best 'till last?

  • 19:00

    Google Drive has more than 190 million 30-day active users.

  • 18:59

    You can now use QuickOffice's MS Office editing built into Google Docs, for example.

  • 18:59

    We're now deep into the "miscellaneous" section of the keynote, the proverbial Google Hufflepuff. Lots of random stuff being thrown at us like they weren't sure where to put it.

  • 18:58

  • 18:58

    Now just imagine of you could get Android and iOS on one phone.... Hmmmmmm.....

  • 18:57

  • 18:57

    This will be made possible through data isolation for enterprise security and bulk deployment of apps. This will be coming to L, but also separately for non-L devices

  • 18:56

    This is a big deal at the moment - the notion of BYOD (or bring your own device) has dominated chatter for the past few months.

  • 18:56

    Most people have a work device and a home device to deal with this. Google wants to change that, so you can put your corporate applications on the same device that's dealing with all your personal data.

  • 18:55

    Pichai is highlighting how people at work are very different to their persona at home - you may be a developer in your 9-5, and a lonely planet backpacker on your days off.

  • 18:54

    Google is really focussing on uniting Android and Chrome, and it looks very nice. Very nice indeed.

  • 18:54

    Flick to the crowd, and I spotted at least four Google Glass-wearing audience members.

  • 18:54

  • 18:53

    That won't stop Steve Jobs from turning in his grave though.

  • 18:52

  • 18:52

    Some people may say that cross-device notifications may be an example of Google "stealing" functionality from Apple, but actually Gmail has been showing these call notifications for some time now - if you used Google Voice, at least.

  • 18:52

    Your smartphone and your Chrombook are going to be more connected than ever.

  • 18:51

    A new feature means that if your phone is with you, your Chromebook will automatically unlock. Incoming call notifications will be synched over to your chromebook, and likewise with text notifications.

  • 18:50

    "All 10 of the top 10 rated laptops on Amazon are Chromebooks." Nice.

  • 18:50

    He's here to talk about the Cr-48, the Chromebook prototype.

  • 18:49

    Back to Sundar Pichai.

  • 18:49

    Honestly though, this is a feature that should have been installed a long time ago.

  • 18:48

    Samsung, Nexus, HTC and LG are all working with Google on this.

  • 18:48

  • 18:48

    Android mirroring is now being built onto the Chromecast, finally. You can now project what's on your smartphone screen onto the bigger TV screen for instance.

  • 18:46

    Backdrop will roll out to all Chromecast users later this summer.

  • 18:45

    It's a nice idea in principle, but most TVs are switched off for 19 hours a day. If suddenly every television set in the world is switched on for 24 hours a day.... that's a lot of wasted electricity.

  • 18:45

    "Your TV is now the largest picture frame in your house. Grandparents everywhere are going to love this feature."

  • 18:44

    Google Backdrop will scroll through a variety of wallpapers and personal photos to an "ambient feed" that will project on your TV - this will be controlled from your smartphone of course.

  • 18:43

    Chromecast wants to make use of your TV, even when its switched off.

  • 18:43

  • 18:43

    Well, actually, yet again he doesn't elaborate. We are placated with an enigmatic "through a variety of technologies." How illuminating.

  • 18:42

    How?

  • 18:42

    Pressing the Cast button will allow Cast control through the cloud without having to connect to a Wi-Fi network.

  • 18:42

  • 18:42

    Here's a big change: you don't need to be on the same Wi-Fi network to control Cast anymore.

  • 18:41

    Apparently Google has launched "new discovery experiences" to make it easier to find these apps... but he doesn't elaborate.

  • 18:41

    In February Google launched the Cast SDK, and in just a few months over 6,000 developers got on board.

  • 18:40

  • 18:40

    "We want to build an ecosystem of Google Cast ready apps, and Google cast ready devices."

  • 18:39

    "We've outsold all other streaming devices combined at major retailer channels like best buy"

  • 18:39

    Now over to Rishi Chandra talking Chromecast.

  • 18:38

    Interestingly, there's no Logitech on the list for Android TV. Not surprising really after the Google TV fiasco.

  • 18:38

  • 18:37

    The entire 2014 range of Smart TVs from Sony, and Phillips' 2015 Smart TV range will be compatible with Android TV.

  • 18:37

    "Android TV is ideal for multiple device types."

  • 18:36

  • 18:35

    His opponent is playing on a Samsung tablet - this is device collaboration at its best.

  • 18:35

    Interestingly, Burke is playing these games on his TV using a PlayStation controller.

  • 18:34

    With Android TV you can play games on the big screen.

  • 18:34

    "3/4 Android users are playing games, which has helped make the Play Store one of the biggest catalogues of games in the world."

  • 18:33

    So now let's talk about games.

  • 18:33

    Also, if you don't have your remote handy you can interact with your TV from your smartwatch. Flick through TV shows from your wrist.

  • 18:33

  • 18:32

    By asking your phone "Who played Katniss Everdeen in the Hunger Games?" Jennifer Lawrence's face will appear on your TV screen.

  • 18:32

    Android TV will combine the power of Google search with Google voice recognition on your TV, driven by your phone. The ultimate smart TV?

  • 18:31

  • 18:31

    Is this a good thing? One, it'll be enabling our addiction to Game of Thrones, and two, looks like Google is collecting more and more details on our daily lives and interests.

  • 18:30

    Android TV will track your activity. So if you binge watch a show, it will automatically recommend the next episode.

  • 18:30

  • 18:29

    These are entertainment devices, so fluidity and ease of use is key.

  • 18:29

    Android TV requires just a D-pad and voice input - "users don't want or expect complexity from their TV"

  • 18:29

    There's now one Android SDK for all form factors - Android TV isn't a new platform, just an extension of what you'd find on the smartphone.

  • 18:28

    Huge applause!

  • 18:28

    "Smart TVs are often limited and not competitive with their mobile cousins. We want to change that. Today we're launching Android TV."

  • 18:28

  • 18:27

    Burke is back to talk about TVs and the living room.

  • 18:27

    ... There is a disappointing lack of Ferrari in that line up.

  • 18:26

    Who's involved? He says there's 40 new partners in the new alliance with Google, including Fiat, Acura, Alfa, Audi, bentley, Fujitsu, Subaru, Suzuki, Skoda, Seat, Kia, Maserati.

  • 18:26

    The Android Auto SDK will be released "soon", and will be available to public with the "L" release.

  • 18:25

    Messaging will be opened up to developer apps. It's the "same API using for notifications on Android Wear"

  • 18:25

  • 18:24

    Well, here's where the new Android Auto SDK steps in. It will help "you just make great apps for the car."

  • 18:24

    "We know it's not easy to build apps for cars today, there are dozens of different car platforms... Wouldn't it be great if building an app for a car was the same as for a smartphone or tablet?"

  • 18:23

  • 18:23

    Incoming messages show up as heads up notifications and are read out by Google's voice.

  • 18:23

    Essentially, he launches directions without ever having to take his hands off the steering wheel or enter an address.

  • 18:22

    He checks whether the De Young museum is open through voice control. Google Now confirms it is, and he kicks off navigation by saying "navigate there."

  • 18:22

    Now time for Google Maps, every driver's best friend. It'll be completely voice enabled - so now Andy's taking us for a drive.

  • 18:21

  • 18:21

    You can use controls on the wheel or voice to navigate Android Auto.

  • 18:20

    Unfortunately the video being projected on screen for the demo is quite jittery and blurry - we're assuming Android Auto will be a lot smoother in reality.

  • 18:20

  • 18:19

    They couldn't bring a car on stage for health and safety reasons, but that hasn't stopped Google bringing up an example car cockpit in front of anyone anyway.

  • 18:19

    "Android auto is contextually aware, to give you the right information right when you need it, and is completely voice enabled so you can keep your hands on the wheel and your eyes on the road."

  • 18:18

  • 18:18

    It's a redesigned Android platform for use in cars, centred around navigation, communication and music.

  • 18:18

    Brady says "there's gotta be a better way" to make the connected car a reality and cut down on crashes. Now Google is announcing "Android Auto."

  • 18:17

    Time to talk about cars... could we be in for some exciting updates on the Google car?

  • 18:16

    Patrick Brady, director of engineering for Android now onstage

  • 18:16

  • 18:16

    The Moto 360 will be available later this summer, cue a disappointed groan from the crowd. It was the only smartwatch with a round screen.

  • 18:16

    The Samsung Gear Live is joining the family too, and will be available to order later today.

  • 18:15

    The LG G watch will be available to order later today on the Play Store.

  • 18:15

    "All devices we're talking about today are water resistant" he reassures the crowd. Clearly though Google has not considered the hazardous nature of some its customers cooking standards. I'd need my smartwatch to be scalding oil resistant too.

  • 18:14

  • 18:14

    Get the recipe on your smartphone, and each step comes up on your smartwatch allowing you to swipe through without having to get your smartphone all sticky.

  • 18:13

    It's now "Allthecooks" turn to demo back on the rather uglier LG G smartwatch.

  • 18:12

    Amazing - he just ordered pizza in just under 20 seconds from his wrist.

  • 18:12

  • 18:12

    Eat24 is being demo'd on a Moto 360 smartwatch, which looks MUCH nicer than the G smartwatch.

  • 18:11

    "Almost all the APIs" from Android are available on Wear, too. It means you can build fully customisable UI and more.

  • 18:10

    A full Android Wear SDK available today, though it's sort of already been out there for a little while. However, now you can run code directly on devices.

  • 18:10

  • 18:09

    "The very best wearable apps respond to the user's context."

  • 18:09

    "Ma'am, I don't care what kind of watch that is or who you can call on it, I need to see your ticket."

  • 18:08

    That will go down well at border control.

  • 18:08

    You can even show your boarding pass for a plane on your smartwatch.

  • 18:08

    Google is really pushing examples of where smartwatches can help you out in everyday scenarios. This is important, especially when we consider the amount of Internet chatter with people asking why they'd want to wear a watch in the first place. That's SO nineties.

  • 18:07

    A quick shot of the protester...

    Thank you for the snap @tristawang!

  • 18:07

    You can also play music from your wrist that will pipe through your smartphone.

  • 18:06

    You can set "do not disturb" on your smartwatch as easily as swiping down on the device's screen. No more notifications for you.

  • 18:05

    Ooo dear, had a bit of a voice recognition fail there talking about "peanut butter." In fairness, the giant echo-y hall has probably got something to do with that.

  • 18:04

    Reminders that you set for yourself on your smartphone (eg. "Ok Google, remind me to check the postbox when I get home") will be synched across to your smartphone.

  • 18:04

  • 18:03

    Android Wear will show a mix of cards from your phone and the watch itself.

  • 18:03

    Live demo of the LG G smartwatch - though it looks pretty grainy.

  • 18:02

  • 18:02

    According to Singleton, "people check their Android phone 125 times a day." If that's not a reason to get a smartwatch, we don't know what is. Looking at your wrist is a lot easier than digging around a handbag or jean pocket.

  • 18:01

  • 18:01

    Oooo miaow that was catty. Sorry. He seems like a lovely guy.

  • 18:01

    For someone talking about fashion, Singleton certainly has a relaxed approach with his bright blue hoody and jeans.

  • 18:00

    Android Wear supports both square and circular screens to play into the variable fashion element of wearable technology.

  • 18:00

    Android Wear is going to be Google's platform for developers building wearable technology apps, and it is based on Android.

  • 17:59

    David Singleton takes to the stage, Director of Engineering

  • 17:59

    Android wants to make sure all these experiences, be it your wearable smartwatch or your TV, to be connected to your smartphone.

  • 17:58

    "We are building the most advanced voice integration experience in the world."

  • 17:58

  • 17:58

    No more details on this "factory reset protection" though, just that people can reset their phones remotely. Will it be enough to appease those calling for remote lock/wipe legislation? Who knows.

  • 17:57

    "With L we're launching factory reset production so if you're phone gets stolen you have full control to disable it"

  • 17:56

    Ooo a big jibe at Apple there: Android has "custom keyboards, widgets, those things happened in Android four to five years ago."

  • 17:55

    A handy graph is now showing the stages of Android innovation from Android 1.0 in 2008 to Android 4.4 now in 2014.

  • 17:55

    "We want to do it in a way that we're innovating at a very fast pace."

  • 17:54

    "The approach we're taking with Android is very unique and distinctive. We're building an open platform at scale."

  • 17:54

    Sundar Puchai is back on stage. Hopefully no more interruptions now.

  • 17:53

  • 17:53

    It's pretty odd that Burke kept talking over that protester though - he was like a kindly steamroller.

  • 17:52

    Burke's still talking about battery life though. Back to reality - whoop! There goes gravity.

  • 17:52

    We have a pretty unhappy heckler here in San Francisco - burly security men are descending on her swiftly.

  • 17:52

  • 17:52

    One protestor doesn't seem happy though - can't hear what she's saying but she is yelling at the top of her lungs at the top of the stage.

  • 17:51

    "Now you can correlate battery discharge from what the device was doing at the time"

  • 17:50

    Now it's time to talk battery life and Project Volta... see what they did there?

  • 17:50

    There you go. Exhibit A: Angry robot Android man

  • 17:50

  • 17:50

    "This is PC gaming graphics in your pocket."

  • 17:49

    This demo is really pumping up the dramatic bass. I think what we're learning is that the new Android L has big bass.

  • 17:49

    Cue video with two angry robot men fighting each other.

  • 17:48

    Android Extension Pack will introduce a set of features including tessellation, geometry shaders and computer shaders.

  • 17:48

  • 17:47

    Now "ART is fully 64-bit compatible," says Burke. This means more memory accessible and new instruction sets, but it also means more memory waste thanks to the larger addressing.

  • 17:46

    Burke displays a series of benchmarks on-screen showing the new ART performance vs. Dalvik. Looks like there's been big improvements, with fewer pauses between switching apps. That's been a big problem for many on Android, especially when hopping between apps.

  • 17:46

  • 17:44

  • 17:44

    Back to Burke to talk all things performance.

  • 17:44

    A new API in Google play services is also happening that will recall search results from apps, based on user's previous actions.

  • 17:43

    What's different about this UI is that app indexing will now be mixed with Google search results. This means that search results will mix app and web results - it's a huge step in integrating apps with the web.

  • 17:43

  • 17:41

    Talking App Indexing now as the third element. Devs love indexing things, especially key fields in databases. It's glorious fun.

  • 17:41

    Now all your individual Chrome tabs are being listed here from the web, making multi-tasking that much easier.

  • 17:41

  • 17:40

    The Chrome Tabs you scroll through are now beautifully shaded with realistic shadow behind your current tab.

  • 17:39

    The second element is redesigned recents.

  • 17:39

  • 17:39

    "This is fast, fluid animation at 60fps"

  • 17:38

    Here we have an example of googleplex searching for Van Gogh's artwork - this is demo eye candy at its most cultured.

  • 17:37

    Google wants to redesign the mobile web experience in three ways. The first is material design.

  • 17:37

  • 17:37

    Avni Shah from the Chrome team is now on stage talking about Chrome for mobile.

  • 17:36

    If you're wearing a bluetooth watch and holding your phone, the phone will auto-unlock. Two-factor authentication that's similar to Pebble smartwatches "Pebble Lock" feature.

  • 17:35

    Great news if you don't want to be disrupted in your pursuit of a high score on Candy Crush Saga...

  • 17:35

  • 17:35

    Google has also introduced a new type of notification L called a "heads up notification." If you're really busy in an app, you might not want to come out of it. A window will pop up with, say, an incoming call and you can choose to interact with it or simply swipe it away and ignore it to carry on with what you're doing.

  • 17:33

  • 17:33

    Over the coming summer months Material will be being extended to "all Google services."

  • 17:32

    What you're seeing here is a sneak peak of work in progress. A taster to get developers excited.

  • 17:32

    A particularly nice effect is that scrolling keeps tabs in place, search box disappears like it does in Chrome or Firefox for Android.

  • 17:31

  • 17:31

    He fires it up on stage in a demo, and shows that rippling touch effect being talked about before. Everything flows seamlessly with interactive design.

  • 17:31

    He's talking about experience and interface. So let's look at the Phone Dialler app as an example.

  • 17:30

  • 17:30

    But now Dave Burke, director of engineering for Android takes to the stage

  • 17:29

    New guidelines are also being introduced for this. Google has already had design guidelines, of course, so new guidelines won't necessarily shake up the world. But, what we've just seen certainly looks clean and modern. We like it.

  • 17:29

    Between the L preview and Polymer, you have a strong framework for building fluid designs and experiences across all devices.

  • 17:28

  • 17:28

    Basically, we're watching the changes from Gmail today to Gmail of tomorrow: bolder colours, grids in dev used to create alignment without actual lines in the finished product

  • 17:27

  • 17:27

    This is a nice attention to detail that goes down well with the crowd.

  • 17:26

    Material surfaces respond to touch with splashes of virtual ink, meaning there is rich and animated touch feedback whenever you interact with Material Design.

  • 17:26

    "Now one design doesn't mean one fits all."

  • 17:25

  • 17:25

    In Material Design, content is the focus. All elements of it will be able to be matched to the colours prevalent in your brand.

  • 17:24

    "We drew inspiration from paper and ink," but Material Design can react intuitively to small changes in precision and depth. App developers will now be able to specify an elevation value in any UI.

  • 17:23

    Duarte: "We wanted a design that was clear and simple, that people would also understand. So we thought what if pixels showed depth as well as colour?" With a round of applause, he points to what Google calls "Material Design."

  • 17:22

  • 17:22

    Puchai hands over to Matias Duarte, VP of Design at Google.

  • 17:22

    Puchai: "With L we wanted to take a radically new approach to design, with a fresh bold and new look."

  • 17:21

    Time L Developer preview, which has over 5,000 new APIs.

  • 17:20

    For example, lets look at an Android One smartphone. It boasts a Dual SIM, SD card, 4.5in screen and costs under $100. It'll be available in India to provide affordable connectivity packages, allowing high quality, affordable smartphones to spread to a previously untapped market.

  • 17:20

  • 17:19

    So Google is working on a new solution called Android One that will provide low cost handsets with stock Android and relevant apps for local communities.

  • 17:19

  • 17:18

    Puchai: "When I go back home to India, it's exciting to see the impact that smartphones are having on people's lives, but it's disappointing that only 10 per cent of the populations have them. We want to change that."

  • 17:17

    In this year alone, app installs on Android are up by 236 per cent. This will make a lot of developers happy.

  • 17:17

  • 17:17

    But it's not all about smartphones, the tablet market has been growing too. in 2012 Android tablet shipments accounted for 39 per cent of the global market. Now, it accounts for 62%. That's pretty impressive.

  • 17:15

  • 17:15

    Interestingly, Android users take over 93 million selfies every day. We're a vain bunch.

  • 17:14

    Where does Android sit in all this? Well over 1 billion users tune in every 30 days.

  • 17:14

    Global smartphone shipment figures show that over 300 million smartphones have been shifted in the last quarter.

  • 17:13

    Puchai is excited by the amount of women involved in this year's I/O. In the room alone there are over 1,000 female developers.

  • 17:12

    A big shout out first of all to those watching the live stream in London - cue lots of excited Brits upsetting their cups of tea by cheering at the camera.

  • 17:12

  • 17:11

    "I/O is a pretty global event," he says. No kidding.

  • 17:11

    Sundar Puchai takes to stage, Senior VP of Android and Apps

  • 17:10

  • 17:10

    "Every little bit matters. Here's to what you build next."

  • 17:09

    This is the best game of moustrap ever played - as the clock reached zero, a whole chain reaction of exciting gizmos are bursting into life across the stage.

  • 17:07

    30 seconds! The lights are dimming.

  • 17:05

    In the meantime, the developers are piling in and the world is watching. No pressure Google.

  • 17:05

    From the looks of it though, we have 2 and a half minutes until things get serious.

  • 17:04

    It really is an impressive countdown clock. It'd make a fantastic replacement for my broken oven timer *crosses fingers that this is one of Google's new products of 2014*

  • 17:03

    Everyone's taking their seats, with many a smartphone camera pointed at the giant industrial wheel dominating the stage counting down to something.... but what could it be?

  • 16:57

    Get ready folks - things are about to kick off.

  • 16:26

    The ITProPortal team is just limbering up. Mouse lifts, keyboard tweaks - just the usual...

  • 16:25

    Just over half-an-hour to go, folks!

  • 14:51

    This would give you a completely holistic view of all your biometric data, and competes directly with Apple's recently-announced HealthKit, which will be available with the iOS 8 update this autumn.

  • 14:50

    What else can we expect from tonight? Well Forbes reported earlier this month that Google is gearing up to launch a new health service called Google Fit, which will group together all your data from health-related apps and popular fitness trackers, such as the FitBit, Jawbone Up and Nike Fuelband.

  • 14:08

    T-minus three hours until everything kicks off at 5pm BST.

  • 13:28

    What do you guys want to see at this year's Google I/O? Let us know in the comment section below or give us a nudge on Twitter @ITProPortal

  • 12:16

    It's now been eight months since Android 4.4 KitKat launched, so a move to 5.0 Lollipop looks likely.

  • 12:16

    Coincidentally, in case you're wondering, the names of the Android updates aren't just randomly plucked from whatever Google's developers are snacking on in the moment. Since Android Cupcake they've followed an alphabetical order: Donut, Éclair, Ginerbread, Honeycomb, Ice cream Sandwich, Jelly Bean and KitKat.

  • 12:14

    Word on the Internet-vine is that the newest iteration of Android will be dubbed "Lollipop," keeping with Google's confectionery-based naming convention.

  • 12:13

    Zombie-survival tips aside, one of the biggest things to come out of Google I/O will likely be the launch of a big update to its Android operating system.

  • 11:49

    Does Google know something we don't know? Suddenly its acquisition of Boston Dynamics amid rumours of building a robot army make sense....

  • 11:48

    In other news, we heard this morning that there is a Google Glass app designed to help you survive the Zombie apocalypse.

  • 11:25

    The Moscone Center in San Francisco is gearing up for a jam-packed first day at Google I/O - poor thing is becoming the village bicycle of Silicon Valley conferences. Apple was there for WWDC just at the beginning of this month!

  • 11:20

  • 10:19

    The device has been upgraded. In short, it now has double the RAM and a longer-lasting battery, but you can check out the full list of details here.

  • 10:14

    By the way, we've got some more news for you aforementioned Glass fans.

  • 09:51

    Check out the full story here.

  • 09:46

    It is expected to allow users to stream video and music, as well as play games. Will it be enough to take down Apple's, Roku's and Amazon's own services though?

  • 09:44

    As usual, Google will provide the software, with another company charged with producing the hardware that encases it.

  • 09:41

    Have you heard the latest? According to a number of sources, Google will definitely reveal a set-top box (or several) later today.

  • 09:32

    Welcome to G-Day!

  • 09:21

    Well that jibe certainly seems to have woken some Glass-lovers up. Things are now all even in the poll.

  • 24 June
  • 17:07

    Seriously? Just a quarter of you would pay £1,000 for something unfashionable, slightly creepy and not particularly useful? You're a tough crowd to please...

  • 14:49

  • 14:49

    Speaking of which, we're curious....

  • 14:48

    This year we're expecting big leaps in the Project Glass scheme, especially in light of the fact that Google Glass is now rolling out outside of the US. Yesterday it officially launched in the UK for £1,000.

  • 14:12

    Clearly, this is an event you don't want to miss.

  • 14:12

    In the past, Google I/O has signalled the birth of Android, Chrome, Google TV, the introduction of the Nexus 7, Project Glass and Google+.

  • 14:10

    For the uninitiated, Google I/O is Google's answer to Apple's WWDC. It's an annual developer conference held in San Francisco. In essence, it is the catapult that launches a bevy of new toys for those developers to play with.

  • 14:05

    Welcome to ITProPortal's live coverage of Google I/O 2014!