4Chan responds to nude celebrity photos by enacting new illegal content policy

4Chan has decided to comply with US laws on stolen content in the wake of being embroiled at a centre of the scandal involving a widespread leak of nude pictures of celebrities.

Related: iCloud hacking scandal sees naked photos of A-list celebrities leaked on 4chan

The image sharing site has decided to enact a Digital Millennium Copyright Act [DMCA] policy that allows the owners of content to have it removed by requesting 4Chan does so.

4Chan will have to remove the content when a “bona fide infringement” notice is received and as well as removing illegal-shared content it will inform those that posted it that it has been removed due to a request under the DMCA.

Anyone that is found to be continually posting stolen material faces having access to 4Chan “terminated” and it’s unclear how big an effect this will have as much of the content is posted anonymously with no identifying information provided.

Up until now the site’s fast-paced nature has meant that most content only stays on the site for a small amount of time thanks to the upper limit on material applied to many boards that meant it “expired”.

Even though there isn’t a formal system to comb through content on the site, 4Chan has removed certain posts in the past that included images depicting sexual abuse of children that were shared on the site.

To handle the new DMCA compliance it has appointed a member of staff to oversee the takedown requests that are expected to mushroom as a result of the new policy being enacted.

4Chan made its move after a glut of nude and explicit photos of A-list celebrities including those of Jennifer Lawrence, Kim Kardashian and Cara Delevigne found their way online after iCloud accounts were reportedly hacked into.

Related: iCloud hackers likely got away with more than just naked celeb photos

Even the FBI has now gotten involved in the investigation and it certainly seems that was enough for 4Chan to act quickly and conform to the DMCA.

Image Credit: Flickr (Marco Manna)