Sigfox wants to become the go-to platform for the Internet of Things

Sigfox wants to take advantage of the Internet of Things [IoT] segment by turning its network into an affordable cellular network for connected objects that is similar to Salesforce and Stripe platforms in other sectors.

Related: Milton Keynes announces plans to build city-wide Internet of Things network

The French startup is transforming its network into one that offers a platform for all types of developers whether it be a huge corporation or startups with a pricing policy that is designed to appeal to both ends of the market.

“Sigfox is perfect for connected objects that need to send a bit of information while using very little power,” Cédric Giorgi, head of startup relations at Sigfox, told Tech Crunch. “From a more technical point of view, you just need a standard radio antenna that can send data on Sigfox’s low frequency.”

Objects that want to interact with Sigfox’s network will only need a tiny battery and basic hardware and there will be a very simple API for developers to use.

Sigfox intends its network to listen to objects, capture the signal and then send data back to the given developer’s servers. The network is able to operate at a lower cost than alternatives due to the fact it uses a very low-level frequency that is currently unused and thus the license fee associated is miniscule. In addition to this, there are less towers needed to construct the complete network due to the lower frequency.

Sigfox already covers the whole of France, Spain, the Netherlands and around 12 major cities in other countries such as Germany and Italy, with expansion into the UK and California currently taking place.

“A few American companies like Salesforce, Twilio and Stripe have become major platforms for other companies. That’s exactly what we want to do, turn our network for connected objects into a platform,” Giorgi said.

A handful of large companies already use Sigfox’s network such as Securitas over in Spain and the security firm is hoping to connect over one million objects to Sigfox. In addition to this a large French insurance company will soon provide small connected objects to its clients and Nigiloc sells a smart bike GPS that runs for two years on a small battery.

Smaller developers can benefit from cheaper pricing due to the fact Sigfox prices it up according to the amount of connected objects that take advantage of the network, and simplicity is at the heart of what Sigfox hopes to deliver.

Related: IT managers: How to prepare your business for the Internet of Things

“If you have the right component, we want you to run on the Sigfox network in three clicks,” Giorgi said.Porthole Ad