Survey shows demand for privacy laws to be harmonised into a global standard

A new survey from the Cloud Security Alliance has found that there is a strong desire to harmonise privacy laws towards a global standard that applies to everyone.

The Data Protection Heat Index report, which took in the opinions of 40 cloud security leaders worldwide, also found that 73 per cent of those surveyed wanted a global consumer bill of rights for data privacy. It also uncovered what it called a "keen interest" in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) principles in terms of shaping the Internet of Things and big data.

The report made a number of discoveries, including the fact that many firms struggle with data residency and sovereignty issues, and that lawful interception saw a "universal interpretation" by respondents, with one example response stating: "The right to access data through country-specific laws if the needs arises, i.e. data needs to be made available for a cybercrime investigation."

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Jim Reavis, CEO of the CSA, commented: "Data privacy considerations are often overlooked in the development phase of cloud, IoT and Big Data solutions, and instead are viewed through a maze of complicated regulations and guidance."

"These findings highlight the very significant opportunity for global co-operation between CISOs and InfoSec professionals, privacy leaders, developers and architects, to build privacy principles into new and emerging solutions."

Read more: Internet of Things: 86% of IT professionals express security and privacy concerns