IP EXPO Europe 2014: As it happened

Hello readers, and welcome to ITProPortal's latest round of live coverage.

This time, the team's upped sticks to the heart of London's beautiful Docklands. It may be a bit grey and dreary in the capital but the ExCeL exhibition centre is alive with colour, people and technology.

Read more: IT departments suffering from inadequate tech infrastructure

IP EXPO Europe, a two-day conference showcasing the most important developments in the world of enterprise IT, is upon us once more and this year's edition looks like it's going to be a scorcher.

Kicking off proceedings on 8 October is none other than Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web who's basically responsible for creating one of the most useful tools the world has ever seen. 2014 marks a quarter of a century since he developed the first draft of the original proposal for what the World Wide Web would become.

Berners-Lee's opening keynote is truly unmissable. He's set to shed light on his vision for the future of the web and address a multitude of issues related to the use of the Internet. Sir Tim has been very critical of the US and UK governments' use of the web over recent months, so expect plenty of fireworks.

It's not all about Sir Tim Berners-Lee, however. Throughout both days, we'll see expert speakers from a vast range of companies, including Microsoft and Hadoop.

This year's show will also be co-located with a pair of brand new complementary events: Cyber Security EXPO and Data Centre Expo. We'll be regularly dipping our heads into both of these to gather as many nuggets of enterprise wisdom we can possibly manage.

Read more: All the news and analysis of IP EXPO 2014

As well as our rolling live coverage of the speeches and general floor activity at IP EXPO Europe, ITProPortal will also be conducting filmed interviews throughout the day, so make sure you drop by our stand and introduce yourself.

Finally, as usual, get in touch with us via the usual channels: Twitter, Facebook and the comments area below.

  • 10 October
  • 09:47

    Logging out now. Thanks for tuning in, everyone!

  • 09 October
  • 17:25

    Here's something we came across earlier. A bit of healthy Google-bashing.

  • 13:34

    Another short and sweet talk from Phillip there, time to go for a wander and see what else we can find

  • 13:33

    So basically, although Radius (if done well) is still recommended as the best route to take, PPSK offers a middle ground between Radius and Pre-Shared Key

  • 13:20

    PPSK - Private Pre-Shared Key. That's what Aerohive are plugging to us now

  • 13:20

    Before it can work, the access server has to tell the network that the client is a valid one

  • 13:19

    "Radius is the best way of doing things"

  • 13:18

    Mac addresses can also easily be tracked and linked to a person, showing reams of historic data about where you and your device have been

  • 13:16

    Changing your Mac address is apparently a very easy thing to do

  • 13:16

    "WEP security, as a standard, has very much gone away. It's really something to avoid."

  • 13:14

    "Hiding your SSID actually makes honeypot attacks much easier to do"

  • 13:13

    "Open security means no security"

  • 13:08

    Connected everything - the peripheral IoT devices we're starting to see connect to the networks

  • 13:06

    Devices will also have different requirements, as well as having different capabilities

  • 13:05

    "Wireless is the only way forward"

  • 13:05

    And what about the devices themselves?

  • 13:04

    This will require different policies for guests, contractors and staff

  • 13:04

    Connected users - all users will have different requirements

  • 13:03

    What internal and external processes do you have in place to protect your network?

  • 13:02

    We're listening to Phillip Keeley from Aerohive Networks

  • 13:00

    On to BYOD now - finding the line between accessibility and security

  • 10:49

    Fascinating stuff. Great to hear!

  • 10:48

    "Robots will start to creep into the creative professions, so we have to stay ahead. But if we cleverly pool our brains together, we can do it. Maybe you have to start taxing robots like people, to disincentivise employers from having too many. I've heard government ministers talking about that."

  • 10:47

    So can we roll this out to the digitally disenfranchised? Will the world take everyone with it, or will some get left behind?

  • 10:46

  • 10:45

    "I think the government's got a bit carried away with teaching everyone to code."

  • 10:43

    Mind. Blown. Amazing keynote by Ade McCormack. Now for some Q&A!

  • 10:43

    "With embedded devices, we'll have the Internet of things in people. We'll effectively be a walking collection of IP addresses. We're done with homo sapiens: now we're looking at becoming homo extensis."

  • 10:42

    "We have to remember that a good doctor with a bad bedside manner is equivalent to a bad doctor, and an average doctor with a good bedside manner is equivalent to a great doctor. We have to get our service side together."

  • 10:38

    "People are going to start falling in love with what they do. They're going to see it as less a way to pay the bills, and more as a path to mastery - like a samurai warrior."

  • 10:35

  • 10:35

    "You can have all the Salvador Dalis and so on, but the real value-kicker is when they can communicate with each other. Acting like a superbrain will give your organisation the competitive advantage."

  • 10:34

    "As humans, we're unusual in the sense that we have a collective consciousness. We learn from the previous generation, so it's in our nature to act like a superbrain"

  • 10:33

    "The power shift has moved from the employer to the employee. There is not enough talent in the world - that's the reality ,and it means the talent is taking control."

  • 10:31

  • 10:31

    "These new models are everywhere. If you use Google, they give you their product for free and then monetise your eyeballs."

  • 10:30

    "We're afraid to take risks. We laugh at people whose business fails - whereas in other countries, if you haven't screwed up a few startups, you're not considered much of a businessman!"

  • 10:29

    "Creativity will become more important: if it's a process task, a machine will do it."

  • 10:29
    "In the West this could be the last days of the Roman Empire, as the world becomes more globalised"
  • 10:28

    "Collaborative consumption is transforming industries. What do you have that you're not getting value out of that you could be? This is frugal capitalism: how do we get more out of what we have/"

  • 10:27

    "There are a lot of changes happening in humanity, and I believe part of that is returning to our true nature"

  • 10:27

    "Since then, we've moved to a management system, where most people don't like the jobs they do, and look forward to the evening, or look forward to retirement. But with the digital revolution, we're returning to our true nature - we're becoming mobile, we're communicating."

  • 10:24

  • 10:24

    "12,000 years ago, we roamed the savannah looking for lunch. We were mobile, and if we didn't communicate we would become lunch. Your output was based on what you caught or picked."

  • 10:22

    Now onto Ade McCormack, Ft columnist and digital strategist, who's going to talk about the idea of the "digital hunter gatherer"

  • 10:20

    Really interesting to hear about the development of digital strategy in government

  • 10:20

    Great talk from Liam Maxwell

  • 10:20

    "There's lots to do, but it's up to local government to want to change. It's not something we can foist on people."

  • 10:18

  • 10:14

    "But it's not about open source or proprietary software - it's about giving people the power to use the tools that are right for them"

  • 10:14

    "We want to break apart the big IT projects and use open source software wherever possible"

  • 10:14

    What are his thoughts on open source in central government?

  • 10:13

    Now for some Q&A

  • 10:13

    He absolutely rocketed through what's apparently usually a half-hour talk in 15 mins.

  • 10:12

    So Liam Maxwell is talking about "Government as a platform" - would that be GaaP?

  • 10:12

    Now it's all about "the right project at the right scale"

  • 10:11

    So no more massive outsourced government IT projects?

  • 10:11

    "No more big IT" is one of the main slogans now

  • 10:08

    The government wanted to "reset" its relationship with technology, by refusing contracts over £100m

  • 10:07

    So £1 billion is about 1 per cent of the whole British economy

  • 10:07

    "In order to make these changes, we needed a better relationship with technology"

  • 10:06

    MOJ are about to start transforming courts, too

  • 10:05

    It's a "marketplace" of people who can vouch for your identity

  • 10:05

    Some serious identity work going on now

    .GOV.UK verify, going live on 14th October

  • 10:04

    it had 10 million visitors for the first time last month

  • 10:03

    .GOV.UK is "designed around the user, not around the government"

  • 10:03

    Interesting stuff about .gov.uk publishing platform

  • 09:43

    He's got the position until 2018, too - so this is the guy who's going to be implementing those policies!

  • 09:43

    Liam Maxwell, the government's first chief technology officer (CTO), has driven Whitehall's IT transformation agenda for several years, previously holding posts as deputy government CIO and director of ICT futures at the Cabinet Office - so should be a lot of insight into government's policies in this talk.

  • 09:42

    Did everyone realise the government even had a CTO? It's part of this whole corporatisation of government, apparently.

  • 09:23

    Welcome back for day 2 of IP EXPO Europe - and it's going to be a cracker! Coming up, we have keynotes from Liam Maxwell, CTO of HM Government no less, and Doug Cutting, the creator of Hadoop. Stay tuned for live pictures, analysis and commentary!

  • 08 October
  • 16:31

    ITProPortal are filming a whole series of video interviews here at IP EXPO, so stay tuned for expert advice from across the IT industries. Want to keep your business secure? Want to deploy into the cloud? These professionals give you their advice right here.

  • 15:44

    The potential benefits for startups and SMBs are also enormous.

  • 15:43

    On paper, definitely a great idea. Just a shame that the national government and local authorities don't seem to have a clue on how to make good effective of it.

  • 15:43

    We've had our first G-Cloud shout-out. Baguley's described it as "a shining light" for the UK.

  • 15:38

    "That Kodak moment" has indeed taken on a completely new meaning.

  • 15:38

    (A little giggle at Kodak, which of course failed to keep up with modern technologies and unfortunately went down)

  • 15:35

    The guys on stage are getting a little frustrated at the microphone situation. Reflected in the audience.

  • 15:31

  • 15:30

    Cloud computing is becoming more mature by the month.

  • 15:29

    This is obviously great news for the technology.

  • 15:28

    Joe Baguley of VMware thinks that the cost benefits associated with the cloud are now so compelling that big companies who you might not necessarily gain that much from the technology are now putting some serious thought into migrating their systems.

  • 15:26

    The hybrid cloud has reared its glorious, fuzzy head.

  • 15:25

  • 15:25

    It seems that everything that could go wrong is going wrong at this talk. A couple of microphones are playing up now. Sort it out, people!

  • 15:22

    Cloud pricing has changed for the better and now enterprises are reviewing their stance on the technology.

  • 15:22

    "The cloud is really about agility."

  • 15:19

    Please bear with us with this one.

  • 15:19

    Gearing up for a cloud discussion now. There's five speakers on stage but unfortunately their names are hidden behind their legs.

  • 15:02

  • 14:56

    "The risk of loss is actually pretty minimal, and encryption at rest only protects you if that physical data container has been lost."

  • 14:53

    "Attackers can actually gain access to your data centre, inadvertently or deliberately."

  • 14:53

    "A data breach is really a representation of a number of different threats. Ultimately a company's main asset is data."

  • 14:50

    Looking at an example of a law firm whose entire cache of legal files was scrambled by cryptolocker - what a way to go down!

  • 14:44

    Lots of interesting stats about Azure - classic Microsoft, always banging on about itself.

  • 14:43

    Now we're hearing Martyn Russinovich, CTO of Microsoft Azure, talking about why distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks are such a danger for cloud services,

  • 14:06

    Don't worry though. We'll gather everyone up again in no time. All went need is a platter of aromatic goodies.

  • 14:04

    Things have got distinctly quieter over the last hour or so.

    Enterprise IT clearly runs on sandwiches!

  • 12:51

    Plan for the unexpected and always be prepared to adapt to certain situations.

  • 12:50

    Don Quixote has got a mention! A few book lovers in the crowd are smiling.

  • 12:50

    With agility can come cost savings, increased morale, reduced reporting of sickness and greater staff retention Bosses everywhere, take note.

  • 12:47

    Mario's not got time for mavericks in the workplace. One weak link can severely hinder operations.

  • 12:46

    "Dare to do philosophy." Be prepared to take a chance in order to achieve something positive.

  • 12:46

    Companies have to plan for here and now, of course, but also can't lose sight of the bigger picture. The future needs to be catered for today.

  • 12:45

  • 12:39

    The rise of the sharing economy now. Businesses need to get rid of unnecessary waste.

  • 12:38

  • 12:37

    I think everyone's thinking longingly of Mr Branson's new Virgin working scheme.

  • 12:37

    Talking about the changing attitudes to working remotely. The world of work is changing quickly.

  • 12:33

    Mario's definitely one of the more upbeat speakers we've ever seen at an enterprise conference.

  • 12:32

    Social awareness, transparency and the changing nature of crime are just a handful of them.

  • 12:31

    However, there are always challenges involved.

  • 12:30

    That's genuinely pretty amazing.

  • 12:30

    The police can now respond to criminal activities via new media like Twitter.

  • 12:27

    Their vision is improving the use of information and sharing it better.

  • 12:27

    The police are under the microscope.

  • 12:26

    He's pulled out an old chestnut. "The new style of IT" has made its first appearance today.

  • 12:26

    The pressure on IT is really high in today's world.

  • 12:25

    Not sure about you, but I don't really associate the public sector with agility...

  • 12:24

    We're talking about agile working in the public sector.

  • 12:24

    Mario's been in this game for over 20 years. I'm sure he's seen the births and deaths of many a trend.

  • 12:23

    Mario Devargas from HP is now on stage.

  • 12:12

    ITProPortal hangs out with this monster - who is walking the show floor for some reason...

  • 12:07

    Great atmosphere on the show floor - a lot of people discussing the keynote earlier from Tim Berners-Lee...

  • 12:07

  • 11:23

    Uh-oh, Sir Tim's car has pulled up outside. The big man's got to move!

  • 11:21

    In the UK, we've traditionally trusted what the government does. We need to create a system that current and future governments don't abuse that trust.

  • 11:20

    He also thinks that the entire system of surveillance needs to improve. A body with power needs to monitor everything that goes on with the government and our data, and needs to perform regular, systematic checks to ensure that nothing untoward is going on.

  • 11:18

    In terms of David Cameron's attempts to increase surveillance, Sir Tim says that we should "be resistant" to that.

  • 11:18

    In terms of David Cameron's attempts to increase surveillance, Sir Tim says that we should "be resistant" tot hat.

  • 11:17

    We're currently sat with Sir Berners-Lee, who's talking about the above topics in a littler more depth.

  • 10:52

    Stay tuned for more from IP EXPO on ITProPortal.com

  • 10:52

    Well, that's it for Tim Berners-Lee! What a talk!

  • 10:51

    "And you can't think of all the weaknesses in advance. We're constantly having to revise the systems."

  • 10:51

    "The spec for HTML was only one page, back then. Now it's about 1,000 pages."

  • 10:51

    "So some stuff is having to be refitted after the fact, but I don't think it could have been any other way."

  • 10:50

    "What if we'd set up a system where you couldn't lie in the 'from' field of an email? We wouldn't get the spam."

  • 10:49

    "I've seen other systems set up where people were much more draconian, and tried to build in security from the start."

  • 10:49

    "All the technology of the Web was designed to look very much like what developers have seen before."

  • 10:48

    Does TBL regret not building security into the Web from the beginning?

  • 10:48

    "It would be terrible if we only had a 'nice web' where you could only write nice things or do nice things. It'd be like paper you can only write cheques on. The medium has to be neutral."

  • 10:47

    TBL: "when you look at humanity, there's a dark side. Still people are doing nasty things to each other. It's amazing after all this time, but the Web is a vehicle. It's like a white sheet of paper."

  • 10:47

    What's going to be the future of the dark side of the Web?

  • 10:46

    "The Internet is going to need everyone to fight to keep it open. That's net neutrality."

  • 10:46

    "There are times when ISPs might consider slowing down your packets because they wonder if you're making them enough money. But when that happens, usually the public comes down on them. Like in Holland, when Comcast tried to slow down Skype packets, and legislation came in to protect it."

  • 10:45

    "The reason I could take something called the World Wide Web and let it loose on an unsuspecting Internet was due to the fact that it was an open network."

  • 10:44

    How can we prevent the soloing of data?

  • 10:44

  • 10:42

    "Of course if something's untrue, you have a right to have it taken down"

  • 10:42

    On the right to be forgotten: "We have to build a system where employers are bound to ignore things you did in your past that you might forget."

  • 10:39

    Now on to questions... what a great talk by Tim Berners-Lee!

  • 10:39

    "We need much better democratic tools. You've got the Web platform - use it! go out and build those tools!"

  • 10:38

    "the web is not just what's out there. Can you think of a better democratic tool that would use the Web? if politicians could have a debate in a place where their arguments can be criticised and deconstructed."

  • 10:35

    "If you give people an understanding of how their data is being used, they're much more open to allowing people to use it."

  • 10:34

    "I don't want companies to use medical data, for instance, to sell me insurance premiums - but if I'm in a car accident, I want my doctor to be able to access any data he needs instantly."

  • 10:33

  • 10:32

    "The idea that privacy is dead is hopelessly sad. we have to build systems that allow for privacy."

  • 10:32

    "We function by having a 'data wall' around us. There fact that you can have a discussion, for instance, that doesn't leave your family, that's the only way that family works."

  • 10:31

    "And privacy is important too. There are people who say 'privacy is dead, get over it' - but I don't agree with that"

  • 10:31

    "We need to build systems that are devastatingly powerful, but can handle this rich aspect of data."

  • 10:30

    "When people talk about big data, they tend to think about size. And that's interesting, but the key thing I think is what I call rich data. It's not that there's a lot of it, it's that there's all kinds of data and it's mixed up."

  • 10:28

    Look how rapt the audience is:

  • 10:28

    "By opening up the data Kimono, by agreeing to share your data - not publicly, but as part of partnerships - that's where the future is."

  • 10:28

    "Artificial intelligence is going to be big. Computers and programming are going to be doing all the planning. They're going to be very smart. The whole economy will be run like this."

  • 10:26

    "The real value of your data is to yourself"

  • 10:24

    "The value of your data to companies is that they can do very good targeting advertising: they can show you an ad that makes you a bit queasy because it's just so much what you were looking to buy."

  • 10:22

  • 10:22

    "Some people think it's about MP's expenses and being publicly open - but it's more important than that. It's the economy of big data."

  • 10:22

    "Don't give me a nice website with visualisations of your data. Give me the raw data, so I can merge it with what I want, so I can find out what that data looks like next to this data. That's open data!"

  • 10:21

    "Where places have an open data infrastructure, everything's easier. When companies own the data they hold, and others can't build apps on it that's bad."

  • 10:19

    "In some companies today, machines are actually making the trading decisions. They're basically running he company."

  • 10:19

    "You might not yet have a completely human-like assistant helping you today, but things are changing fast. In my day, they taught in schools that computers are good for some things, and humans for others. Computers were good for calculations, but they could never do intuitive things like play chess or drive a car. Well hello!"

  • 10:18

    "When I started, I had to get people to download a web browser, usually through FTP sites. But now the pace of innovation has sped up again."

  • 10:17

  • 10:17

    "Now we've got a third platform, and in the future, that's going to be really exciting. not just because of what it is, but what it enables. That's the value of a platform."

  • 10:16

    "Now, every webpage is a computer..."

  • 10:15

    "And now HTML 5 is a whole new platform."

  • 10:15

    "HTML was basically a web of documents - documents for people to read, and click through. And then web pages became dynamic because they had bits of Javascript in them."

  • 10:15

    "A central point of control of the Web would have hindered its growth, and of course people would have built competing systems."

  • 10:14

  • 10:13

    "That's why we have to keep fighting for Net Neutrality"

  • 10:13

    "I didn't have to worry about how the Internet worked, and the Internet didn't have to worry much about me either."

  • 10:13

    "Many people now have grown up knowing that a click could take you anywhere in the world, but back then it was hard to explain to people. Back then, links only took you to other places on the same CD-ROM."

  • 10:11

    "I thought: 'this is something worth doing anyway,' even though we didn't have any structure..."

  • 10:09

    "I wrote it in 1989, and nothing happened. No one said 'go ahead and do it'."

  • 10:09

    "This year is the 25th Anniversary of when I first wrote a memo on the World Wide Web"

  • 10:08

    TBL: "I've been asked to talk a bit about the future..."

  • 10:07

    TBL leaps up onto the stage with a lot of energy...

  • 10:07

    There's a lot of buzz in the room waiting for Berners-Lee...

  • 10:06

    We're just waiting for the opening keynote with Tim Berners-Lee to kick off - the father of the Internet! This is where he's going to be sitting...

  • 10:06

    Welcome to the ITProPortal IP EXPO live blog! Stay tuned for photos, commentary and analysis right here.