FBI: #GOP attack would beat "90 per cent" of cyber security

The FBI has basically challenged the #GOP hackers group to hit the government systems.

Joe Demarest, assistant director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's cyberdivision, said that only a handful of companies could have defended themselves from the attack that devastated Sony pictures recently.

"The malware that was used would have gotten past 90 per cent of the net defences that are out there today in private industry and [would have been] likely to challenge even state government," Demarest said, comments which were officially confirmed later by the FBI.

Speaking at a Senate Banking Committee hearing, Demarest revealed that the FBI’s investigation had shown the attack's “level of sophistication is extremely high,” and that it was “organised” and “certainly persistent.”

Demarest also said that the FBI could not determine, beyond the point of reasonable doubt, that it was North Korea, or hackers from that country, who performed the attack on Sony Pictures.

“There is no attribution to North Korea at this point,” he said.

A hacker group calling themselves Guardians of Peace (#GOP) recently attacked the systems of Sony Pictures, and stole classified data, including celebrities’ phone numbers, information about pay for certain films, as well as some yet unreleased movies, including Fury starring Brad Pitt.

They threatened to leak all the data online, unless Sony stops the airing of The Interview, a movie with Seth Rogen and James Franco, describing the movie as an “act of war”.

The media quickly linked hackers with North Korea, due to the film’s plot revolving around the assassination of the North Korean leader, as well as the similarities between the hack, and the attack by North Korea against South Korean media companies that occurred in 2013.