Apple comes out on top in faulty logic board lawsuit

Apple has received a favourable decision in a court case alleging that the firm deliberately mislead consumers.

Today a Californian judge dismissed a lawsuit filed by Uriel Marcus and Benedict Verceles, claiming that the Cupertino-based firm sold MacBooks containing logic boards known to be faulty.

Read more: Apple facing another lawsuit over ‘deceptive’ iPhone storage size

The two plaintiffs, who filed the lawsuit back in May 2014, took the case to court on behalf of all MacBook owners who purchased their laptops after 20 May 2010. In particular, the suit hinged on whether Apple used promotional campaigns in order to sell MacBooks containing the defective hardware.

US District Court Judge William Alsup rejected the claims, however, stating that there was no proof that consumers relied on Apple’s marketing before deciding to purchase a MacBook.

Marcus and Verceles were also able to use their computers for 18 months and two years respectively, meaning that Apple was not in breach of its warranty guarantees. In fact, the technology giant replaced Verceles’ logic board after it was found to be faulty.

In response to Judge Alsup’s verdict, Marcus and Verceles have until 22 January in order to amend their complaint or the case will be considered closed.

Apple is no stranger to lawsuits and will be relieved that the MacBook decision was found in their favour. In the last few months, the firm has been accused of breaking competition laws with its iTunes service and deceiving consumers over the available storage in its range of iPhone handsets.

Perhaps the most high-profile court case faced by the company was its long-running patent dispute with rival smartphone manufacturer Samsung. The issue was eventually resolved in August last year, after the two firms agreed to cease all litigation outside of the US.

Read more: Jury reaches decision in Apple iPod trial

As a result of the MacBook verdictbarcl Apple’s shares rose by 3.8 per cent, closing at $111.89.