O2 has a solution to your growing email burden

O2 has launched a new conference calling solution for businesses, named Just Call Me.

The service turns a mobile number into a conference bridge, removing the need for dial in details and hidden premium rate charges, it is said in the press release.

O2 Just Call Me can host a call for up to 20 participants, with no PIN codes and no premium rate dial-in numbers. Participants do not need to have the app installed themselves and to join a call they just need to dial the host’s mobile number as normal.

The host of the call can then accept or decline the participant. Available exclusively to O2 Business customers for £5/month (ex VAT), the host can also plan, organise and schedule their calls directly from the app as well as control multiple conferences at the same time.

Accompanying the launch is a research showing just how much time we spend writing and replying to emails. If you’re not sure how much time you spend on that activity, let me tell you.

You spend an average of 288 hours, which equals to 36 working days of the year just writing emails.

If you think that’s a lot, you’re not alone.

According to the new research from O2 Business, aside from the 288 hours a year, over a third of employees feel ‘overwhelmed’ by their inboxes, sending on average 4,118 emails a year and receiving 6,225.

Despite over half (56 per cent) believing that calling is more effective, the study into workplace communication revealed that the UK is becoming increasingly over-reliant on email with nearly two thirds (59 per cent) of workers using this form of correspondence more than any other.

Over half (52 per cent) of UK workers found conference calls to be more personal, and one third (32 per cent) felt they helped them manage their time more efficiently. But conference calls are often not widely used in the workplace with the main reasons cited as noisy environments (24 per cent), and difficulty with scheduling calls in diaries (19 per cent).

Furthermore, over a third (38 per cent) of respondents believe it is easier to get a point across during a conference call, whereas nearly two thirds (58 per cent) of workers worry that the content of their emails will be misconstrued.