Can't decide who to vote for in the General Election? Use these 5 tools to find out

The General Election is fast approaching, with opening day on May 7th 2015. If you still don’t have a decided party, there are plenty of tools online to help match your ideas with that of one of the five parties attempting to win the election.

VoteMatch

The most popular voting quiz for election, VoteMatch offers 20 questions on policies and lets you vote for, against or neutral, following with how strongly you feel on the matter.

Things like letting more immigrants into the country, raising the tax for those earnings £150k all merge into a final result of which party you should be voting for, based purely on policy instead of faces.

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They Work For You

Don’t know who your local candidate is? They Work For You is a great resource showing who the candidate is, what he or she voted for and against and how many times he or she has rebelled against the agenda of his or her constituency.

Ultimately, the local representative will be making the decisions inside the town, meaning their ideas and policies will directly affect you.

Vote For Policies

Vote For Policies is another voting quiz that offers much more choice between the parties, showing you a manifesto of a certain policy without showing the party name.

Users get to decide whether they agree with the manifesto or disagree, covering a broad range of topics.

Who Should I Vote For?

A much easier way to get a straight answer is with Who Should I Vote For?, which asks 20 questions and gives you a bar chart of who you strongly agree with and who you strongly disagree with, avoiding the hassle of some of the more lengthy quizzes.

PositionDial

PositionDial is a much more sophisticated way of finding out what parties you are most fond of, but also how inconsistent your opinions are compared to parties. For instance, you may be heavily against adding more debt to fund social services, but may be in favor of lowering university fees, a direct contradiction between Labour and Conservative.

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