TomTom Bandit Action Camera offers swift video editing and sharing

TomTom is travelling in a new direction away from its traditional navigation devices, and squaring up to GoPro with the release of a new action camera.

The TomTom Bandit Action Camera is due to emerge later this month in Europe (and later in the summer over in the US), and aims to make it quick and easy to film and edit videos, and then swiftly share them with friends.

The key selling point here is that you don’t need to download the footage to your PC and edit/share it from there – you can do all this directly on the device itself, in conjunction with a smartphone app (which will initially be iOS-only, but an Android version will be available soon after, TomTom notes).

The Bandit camera has a built-in media server, and hooked up with a smartphone, it allows the user to instantly review and edit video clips on the handset. TomTom claims that “in editing mode, a simple shake of the smartphone instantly creates an exciting movie”. Plus you can make other tweaks such as adding music to your footage.

TomTom’s new Bandit is loaded with in-camera motion and GPS sensors, and it automatically finds and tags exciting moments (based on measurements like speed, heart rate, acceleration, G-force), so you can skip straight to these – plus there’s a button you can jab on the gadget to manually select a highlight. This is all a nifty idea, and allows you to cut straight to the best bits when sharing your video.

As for the camera itself, it’s a 16 megapixel effort with a wide angle lens, capable of filming 1080p footage at 60 fps and 4K video. It’s also waterproof.

Corinne Vigreux, co-founder and managing director, TomTom Consumer, commented:
"We know that the biggest frustration people have with action cameras today is the time and effort it takes to edit. With TomTom Bandit we've cut the editing time down from hours to minutes – all it takes is a shake!"

When the Bandit Action Camera comes out later in May it will be priced at £300, and that may be a stumbling block for some – but it’s certainly a very cool sounding invention.