Sweden dismisses Julian Assange appeal against arrest warrant

Wiki Leaks founder Julian Assange has had his appeal against his arrest warrant rejected by the Swedish Supreme Court.

Mr Assange has been living in the Ecuadorian embassy in London since 2012, after a warrant was issued for two counts of sexual assault in 2010.

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Investigators from Sweden are now expected to travel to London to question Mr Assange over the allegations. The Supreme Court argued that there was no reason to lift the arrest warrant as there were already plans in place for a meeting with Assange. There were also concerns that Mr Assange could flee if the warrant was rescinded.

In an interview with Reuters, Mr Assange’s lawyer Per Samuelson expressed his frustration with the ruling.

“We are of course disappointed and critical of the Supreme Court's way of handling the case,” he said. “This decision has been taken without letting us close our argument."

Mr Assange, the editor-in-chief of Wiki Leaks, has been unable to move outside of a small section of the embassy in London, with officers from the Metropolitan Police stationed outside to arrest him should he attempt to leave. It is estimated that the cost of this police operation has reached £10 million.

The Wiki Leaks founder denies allegations that he sexually assaulted two women while travelling to Sweden in August 2010. He currently stands accused of one count of unlawful coercion, two counts of sexual molestation, and one count of lesser-degree rape.

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However, Mr Assange claims that the allegations have been fabricated in order to force his extradition to the United States. Wiki Leaks has been behind the unauthorised publication of thousands of classified US documents. The US government, however, has not formally issued an extradition request against Mr Assange.