App quality dictates customer satisfaction

The performance of retail websites and mobile apps is strongly linked to customer satisfaction, loyalty and spend, a new study called An App Is Not Enough suggests.

Basically, the better the site and the app, the better the business.

Mobile apps play an increasingly important role in consumers’ lives with 70 per cent of consumers surveyed making more than a quarter of purchases online, according to the study by AppDynamics, the application intelligence company.

Twenty per cent of those surveyed admitted to making purchases on their phone whilst at work in front of their computer. The survey also found that:

Almost a third (30 per cent) of Brits use mobile shopping apps to compare prices to ensure they get the best deals

Over two thirds (68.24 per cent) of consumers state that the performance of a mobile app impacts their perception of a retailer

Over a quarter (25.77 per cent) of UK respondents use shopping apps when they cannot find what they are looking for in store

Over two thirds (68.24 per cent) of consumers state that the performance of a mobile app impacts their perception of a retailer, with another 67 per cent adding that if the retailer’s app experience was bad, they’d put off shopping.

This puts an enormous amount of pressure on brands to deliver flawless application performance if they want to protect mobile revenue streams.

“As the lines between work and personal, digital and physical, continue to blur, retailers must ensure their apps function at all times across multiple platforms in order to retain and nurture always-on consumers. Technology has transformed the retail landscape significantly over the past decade, and now more than ever, software plays a key role in defining business success – with revenue and reputation often hinging upon customer interactions with apps,” comments Jyoti Bansal, founder and CEO of AppDynamics.

The study, which surveyed 1,000 UK smartphone and tablet owners, also found:

Almost two thirds (64 per cent) of consumers want mobile apps that allow them to purchase products in store rather than queuing for a sales assistant

Almost half (48 per cent) of British consumers would like retail apps to provide store assistants with details of past purchases for a tailored omni-channel experience

Over half (50.45 per cent) would be encouraged to visit bricks and mortar stores if apps provided them with personalised offers when they were close by

If unable to complete a purchase, 70 per cent of consumers claimed that a prompt, personal apology or discount code would persuade them to revisit the retailer.