Consumer interest in smartphones is waning, with the Galaxy S6 on the slide

Consumer demand for smartphones in the US has ebbed in recent times, despite the launch of new flagship hardware from Samsung.

Such are the findings of a new report from Argus Insights, which used data drawn from around 620,000 American consumer phone reviews since January 2014.

The research found that in Q2 of this year, smartphone consumer demand fell by eight per cent compared to June 2014.

That's a fair old drop in interest, and the worse news for Samsung is that in this period the company would have expected interest to be spiked by the launch of the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge.

Overall, Samsung is still top of the tree along with Apple in terms of consumer interest, but the consumer data for the second quarter showed that while the Galaxy S6 created some good initial buzz and demand, that very quickly ebbed, and there was a "dwindling volume of lacklustre reviews" observed.

Apple, on the other hand, received growing interest in its iPhone 6 range, despite the fact that the handsets are relatively old news now having been launched last autumn.

Argus Insights also estimates a "delight ranking" for the phone vendors based on consumer reviews, and found that while Apple and Samsung were amongst the highest rated and most "delightful" handset makers, Microsoft and Asus actually saw the highest scores in this category.

And when it came to mid-tier phone vendors, Motorola ranked the highest above LG and HTC.

John Feland, CEO and founder, Argus Insights, commented: “This last quarter showed a very dramatic decline in consumer interest in the available smartphones in the US, and even the latest Samsung flagship phones barely made a difference in overall excitement.

“In fact, iPhone 6 demand, as measured by consumer review analysis, jumped when customers waiting to purchase and apparently open to buying a Samsung, instead chose an Apple iPhone. Even the early launch of the Note 5 is unlikely to take share away from Apple unless Samsung delivers more than just upgraded hardware. It seems at this point, with such a flagging in consumer interest, that perhaps the smartphone market has hit a saturation point.”