A good service is operating on all stations: WiFi Calling from EE on the Underground

With the “always-on” world that we live in, it’s easy to forget that there are still places where getting a good mobile phone signal is difficult. Londoners will be well aware of the frustration of having your conversation terminated as you go underground, but poor mobile signals are witnessed all over the country, whether your living in a basement flat or simply at the mercy of underdeveloped rural infrastructure.

When it comes to business users, however, a bad signal could have major repercussions – a lost connection could ultimately mean lost revenue. According to research carried out earlier this year, UK businesses are losing out on more than £30 million a week due to poor mobile phone signals with 43 per cent of employees spending an hour or more searching for an adequate connection. You may be a retailer that needs to speak to a customer regarding a delivery later today or a technology giant looking to secure a high-profile acquisition, but in both cases dependable communication is key.

Due to the competitive nature of modern business, companies need to be connected all the time, particularly during normal office hours. Even if you’re an independent retailer, customers and clients can become quickly frustrated and move on when faced with a company that isn’t easily contactable. When a business misses a call, 85 per cent of customers will not ring back. Of course, they may wait for the company to get in contact with them, or perhaps more likely, look at a competitor. In the fast-paced world of modern business, it is easy for customers to find the contact details of one of your rivals and provide them with business that could have been yours.

It is, however, impossible for businesses to ensure that every phone call is answered and if employees need to take the Tube or train to a meeting, say, remaining available has been largely impossible – until now. Mobile phone signals are still unable to permeate deep underground and network black spots elsewhere, particularly in rural areas, are still relatively common. However, there is another well-known form of wireless communication that can help businesses stay connected. WiFi Calling from EE is the latest helping hand being offered to companies that can’t afford to be cut off from their colleagues or clients for long periods.

The service is easy to set up in a just a few short steps, depending on your particular smartphone, and then users simply need to ensure that they are connected to the relevant WiFi network in order to make calls. Furthermore, your device should automatically connect to the same WiFi network after your initial use. Not only does this enable businesses to stay connected, it also gives them greater agility than ever before, allowing them to keep on the move without having to disconnect while they switch to WiFi.

WiFi Calling is particularly valuable for London-based firms or any business that regularly finds itself using trains or any other form of transport where the WiFi signal is consistent, but the mobile reception is not. Available in ticket halls, walkways and platforms at more than 100 London Underground stations (although not in tunnels or between stations), WiFi Calling from EE provides greater connectivity than ever before with a service that is quick and easy to access. Individuals simply need to be an EE customer before texting EEWIFI to 9527 and they will receive a password enabling them to register. Once complete, they simply select the relevant WiFi network while at participating stations, and whether you need to make a quick phone call at Kings Cross or stream a company video at Leicester Square, being underground no longer means being out of the loop.

In addition, it’s not only London-based businesses that stand to benefit from WiFi Calling. Glasgow has its own subway system with WiFi available, while both the underground rail networks in the Tyne and Wear and Merseyside areas also have plans for WiFi connectivity to be installed over the next few years. Similarly, it’s not only underground train networks that suffer from bad mobile reception. Your home or office may well suffer from poor mobile connectivity but have a strong WiFi signal, making it the ideal situation in which to use WiFi Calling.

Businesses may be concerned that this extra level of connectivity will cause a dent in their IT budgets, but WiFi Calling from EE won’t actually cause any changes to your mobile bill at all. Calls and texts made over WiFi will come out of your monthly allowance as usual, and any out of allowance calls will remain charged at the standard rate. For EE business customers, therefore, WiFi Calling could end up saving them significant sums in lost revenue, without any additional financial outlay.

The ease of using WiFi Calling is another of its major benefits. There are no apps required and connection is straightforward. In order to benefit from this service, individuals will need a WiFi Calling compatible device, but businesses have a wide variety of options to choose from across Android, iOS and Windows Phone operating systems, including the recently released iPhone 6s. Customers should be aware, however, that WiFi Calling on Android and Windows devices is only supported if handsets are purchased from one of the EE stores, online or via its telesales team.

Whether you’ve faced the frustration of having your conversation cut short as you make your way onto the London Underground or are simply fed up of wandering around your office with your phone in the air, there is no reason for modern businesses to put up with poor mobile connectivity. WiFi Calling from EE enables employees to make use of the UK’s growing network of WiFi connections to ensure that productivity remains high wherever they are.

By seamlessly transitioning to WiFi Calling, businesses can provide reliable communications to customers and clients without having to go signal hunting, facing increased phone bills or having to download a bespoke app – ensuring a better service without any extra hassle.