TalkTalk offering just £30 in compensation despite huge customer losses

The fallout from the TalkTalk data breach is continuing, following disappointment over the amount of compensation being offered to affected customers.

Ian Rimmington from West Yorkshire told The Register that he had been offered just £30.20 in compensation, despite seeing £3,500 disappear from his account following the hack.

Read more: Consumers call for TalkTalk to face higher fine over data breach

In his conversations with TalkTalk CEO case manager John Gusterton, Mr Rimmington discovered that he would not be receiving any more compensation other than the £30.20 “gesture of good will.”

“I asked him [Gusterton]: 'If my card details were encrypted and no details lost, then why are you giving me the credit?'. I then asked about the conflicting information over the last week and was met by a wall of silence,” Mr Rimmington explained.

To add further insult, Mr Rimmington was informed that if he wanted to leave TalkTalk due to a loss of trust stemming from the data breach, he would still have to pay a contract cancellation fee.

Since the security breach occurred late last month, which resulted in hackers acquiring 1.2 million email addresses and 21,000 unique bank account numbers and sort codes, TalkTalk has provided an, at times, confusing picture of how the attack took place. Despite claiming that credit card information was encrypted or tokenised, they have asked customers to remain vigilant against fraud.

Read more: MPs want more details regarding the TalkTalk breach

Customers that are fighting for compensation from TalkTalk should perhaps bear in mind that previous victims have repeatedly had their case rejected by the mobile network. Customers affected by a security breach that hit the company back in November last year have been unable to secure any kind of reimbursement, despite around a dozen individuals losing up to £5,000. TalkTalk insists that it is not liable for any incidences of fraud, because no complete financial records were stolen from its servers.