Cyber-security jobs reaching an all-time high

Do you know what's the main similarity between Santa Claus and an unemployed cyber-security expert in the UK? They're both fictitious characters – you have better chances of stumbling upon a real Santa than finding an unemployed cyber-security expert, and the trend will continue in 2016, all thanks to major cyber-attacks we’ve seen lately, including TalkTalk, JD Wetherspoon, Sony and – most notably – Ashley Madison.

According to the Manpower Employment Outlook Survey asks, which asked more than 2,000 British employers whether they intend to increase or cut down the size of their workforces, demand for cyber security experts has quadrupled to a record high over the last year.

Hiring will increase in the new year, with the report's net employment outlook rising two percentage points to +7 per cent, its strongest level since the fourth quarter of 2014.

However, cyber-security is where it shines.

"We expect the biggest growth area next year to be in ‘cyber security crisis management’, with large organisations bolstering their own in-house security teams as well as calling on specialist contractors," said Mark Cahill, UK managing director of ManpowerGroup.

Cyber-crime is estimated to cost the global economy $445bn each year and cause £34bn worth of damage to the UK economy, The Telegraph added in its report.

Ashley Madison hack was among the biggest cyber-attacks of 2015. Hackers threatened to publish the names of up to 37 million AshleyMadison.com customers. That is a dating websites for those looking for a little action on the side.