Information managers will need to be much more

An in-depth study on the relationship between information officers and their employees reveals that the two don’t really understand each other’s ideas very well.

Iron Mountain and AIM have released the study which says information managers are expected to be competent in risk management by 2020. Security and privacy is the top concern, followed by content management across various formats, and data analytics.

The study suggests that the profession is changing, now becoming more technical, and more closely aligned to data analysts and the IT department.

But it’s not just that information officers are expected to be competent risk managers, they will also be required to properly identify new business opportunities, and be able to change.

In the latter seems to be the greatest gap between employers and employees. More than 70 per cent of employers consider change a highly important skill, yet only half of records and information managers are confident in having that skill today.

On the other hand, they value training, which is a shame because just 12 per cent of employers gave any weight to mentoring capabilities.

Thinking innovatively is the only skill where both sides meet. Some 72 per cent of employers desire it, with 62 per cent records and information managers offering it. A ‘relationship-building’ skill is also equally important on both sides of the spectrum.

“Organisations the world over share common goals when it comes to managing information in an increasingly digital universe: they want to keep it secure and compliant while being able to analyse and extract its full value for business competitiveness and growth,” said Sue Trombley, managing director of thought leadership at Iron Mountain.

“For the records and information managers at the heart of this, it’s no longer enough to be a competent records manager. It’s time for them to evolve into next-generation information professionals with stronger technical, analytical and management skills and the confidence to think, mediate and guide.”