The East-West divide of employee happiness

There's a new report that says employees are happier, more loyal and more productive in the West, than those in the East.

According to the report, workers in the US, Germany and the UK rated better in the abovementioned metrics than workers in Japan and Singapore.

Here are some of the report's statistics:

  • Almost a third of US workers (29 per cent) consider themselves loyal to their employer. Germany is on second place with 27 per cent.
  • At the same time, worker loyalty in Japan is five per cent.
  • When it comes to worker satisfaction, 15 per cent in the US and 10 per cent in Germany have given themselves a 10/10, while in Japan that's at five per cent, and three per cent in Singapore.
  • When it comes to productivity, 20 per cent of US workers gave themselves a 10/10, and 16 per cent of Germans did the same. Twelve per cent of UK workers gave themselves a 10/10.
  • In Singarpore, nine per cent gave themselves a 10/10 for productivity, followed by Japan with five per cent.

However, there’s one small detail the report throws in the shade – these are all self-assessments. I’m not sure to what extent cultural effect has been added into the report, but the way people perceive themselves in the West and in the East is diametrically opposed, and that obviously reflected on these results.

But the positive thing about this report, globally, is that 40 per cent of early technology adopters (#GenMobile) said they’d never work for a company that wouldn’t allow them to bring their own devices to work. That suggests how mobility, and the BYOD initiative, are playing an increasing role in the shaping of the future workplace.

Chris Kozup, Chris Kozup, Vice President of Marketing at Aruba, a Hewlett Packard Enterprise company commented: “Companies are only as good as their talent. Looking at these findings, there is a risk of employers missing out on huge talent pools through not addressing mobility in full. The way we work is changing to suit the needs of #GenMobile and if companies do not stay ahead of the curve they may inadvertently be creating less productive working environments that are overlooked by the best candidates.”

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