Extreme 'no-cloud' policy to be extinct soon enough

Within the next four years, the extreme 'no-cloud' policy among businesses will be as rare as 'no-internet' policy is today, Gartner predicts.

By 2020, however, not everything will be cloud-based, but companies having absolutely nothing in that respect will be almost extinct.

"Aside from the fact that many organisations with a no-cloud policy actually have some under-the-radar or unavoidable cloud usage, we believe that this position will become increasingly untenable," said Jeffrey Mann, research vice president at Gartner.

"Cloud will increasingly be the default option for software deployment. The same is true for custom software, which increasingly is designed for some variation of public or private cloud."

Gartner says hybrid solutions will dominate, meaning public ones will have to be part of the overall cloud strategy, at least to some extent.

It was also said that within the next three years, 30 per cent of the 100 largest vendors’ new software investments will have switched from cloud-first to cloud only.

Vice president and Gartner Fellow, Yefim V. Natis says this will force ‘reluctant organisations closer to cloud adoption’. "Rigid organisations cannot produce agile IT solutions. As delivery shifts more to the cloud, most IT organisations will have to reorganise to reflect the business realities of cloud computing.”

It is also predicted that the Infrastructure as a Service market will continue to grow, ultimately outpacing server revenues. By 2020, together with Platform as a Service (PaaS) it’s expected to hit $55 billion.

"With the growth of both bimodal computing and cloud provider offerings, software-defined enterprise data centres have become less centrally important than building a strong multiprovider management capability," explained Thomas J. Bittman, vice president and distinguished analyst at Gartner.

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