BMW, Intel, Mobileye team up for autonomous cars

It seems that the recent tragedy in which a person was killed while riding an automated Tesla vehicle isn’t discouraging car makers from pursuing their dream of fully autonomous vehicles on our roads.

In a latest announcement, three companies from three different industries have teamed up to bring fully autonomous vehicles to mass production within the next five years, and wait ‘till you hear who the three companies are.

BMW Group as the representative of the automotive industry, Intel as the technology company, and Mobileye as computer vision and machine learning representative. That’s quite the triumvirate.

The three companies, which have announced their partnership on July 1 at the BMW Group Headquarters in Munich, have recognised the scope of the challenge at hand, and said that they’ve created a set of milestones to track their progress.

First, they’ll demonstrate an autonomous test drive with a highly automated driving (HAD) prototype. Next year, the platform will extend to ‘fleets’, with more test drives.

But they’re not just interested in getting autonomous vehicles on highways, but in urban areas, as well, it was said.

“Today marks an important milestone for the automotive industry as we enter a world of new mobility. Together with BMW Group and Intel, Mobileye is laying the groundwork for the technology of future mobility that enables fully autonomous driving to become a reality within the next few years,” said Mobileye Co-Founder, Chairman and CTO Professor Amnon Shashua.

“Following our investment in high-definition live map technology at HERE, the combined expertise of Intel, Mobileye and the BMW Group will deliver the next core building block to bring fully automated driving technology to the street. We have already showcased such groundbreaking solutions in our VISION NEXT 100 vehicle concepts. With this technological leap forward, we are offering our customers a whole new level of sheer driving pleasure whilst pioneering new concepts for premium mobility.”

Image Credit: Flickr / RoadOver