Hummingbad and Cryptowall dominate the malware game

For such a small share, Hummingbad has made quite the racket.

Hummingbad, Cryptowall and Dorkbot have been the three biggest, most dangerous malicious applications in the first half of this year, according to a new report by Check Point.  Each in its own category (Hummingbad for mobile, Cryptowall among ransomware, and Dorkbot for banking), these three malware families have been wreaking havoc all over the world. 

The results have been published in a newly released Check Point report, entitled H1 2016 Global and Regional Trends of the ‘Most Wanted’ Malware, which you can find on this link.  Among malware, Conficker has the biggest market share – 17.4 per cent. However Hummingbad, even though it only has a 3.6 per cent market share, is to blame for 72 per cent of all mobile attacks.   

Cryptowall has a 44 per cent share among ransomware, remaining the biggest and most dangerous threat. Other two, Cerber (19 per cent) and Locky (13 per cent), have less share combined – 32 per cent. Among banking malware, IRC-based Dorkbot takes the number one spot with 31 per cent, surpassing the likes of Zeus (27 per cent) and Tinba (16 per cent).  

"The first half of 2016 demonstrates the nature of today’s cyber threat landscape,” Check Point said in the report.  

“Many old malware threats remain prominent, while at the same time newcomers have swiftly risen to prominence. Malware is also demonstrating a long tail distribution with a small number of families responsible for a major part of the attacks, while thousands of other malware families are rarely seen. Lastly, we see that most cyber threats are global and cross-regional.”  

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