Legacy tech is hindering innovation, says Telstra

Big companies would love to digitally disrupt their markets, but legacy IT systems and non-flexible infrastructure are the two greatest hurdles.

Big companies would love to digitally disrupt their markets, but legacy IT systems and non-flexible infrastructure are the two greatest hurdles.  This is according to a new report by Telstra, entitled Disruption, digital transformation and effective technology strategy, released today.  

Almost three quarters (73 per cent) of surveyed companies said they’re exposed to digital disruption, and almost two thirds (61 per cent) are interested in disrupting the market themselves. However, the amount of time needed for IT projects, as well as the reliance on IT intermediaries are causing a lot of frustration.  

“The research data suggests that organisations need to retune their networking and technology strategies. Less than 20 per cent state that their IT organisation totally supports their business goals, and yet these same business goals are tightly intertwined with digital and business transformation strategies,” said Tim Dillon, Founder and Director of Tech Research Asia (TRA) and author of the report. 

“As disruption and competitive activity intensify, it is imperative that companies have the right foundations in place to support their future success.” 

Businesses aren’t just sitting idly on this information – 97 per cent of them already have a formal digital disruption strategy. The biggest goals of these strategies is to improve customer experience through engagement, streamlining operations and moving commodity technology infrastructure to a managed environment.  

“The message to businesses is that disruption is happening, regardless of what industry you are in. Smart investments can be made that will realise greater efficiencies in the long run. It’s up to them to decide if they will continue to be disrupted or use the tools available to be disruptive forces themselves,” said Clarke.

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