Legal CIOs more inclined to AI and machine learning

They're also more worried about possible errors, too.

IT decision makers in the legal sector are much more inclined to using artificial intelligence and machine learning than their counterparts in other industries.  This is according to a new report by CenturyLink, based on a poll of 200 ITDMs across a wide array of industries. 

More than half of legal sector staff use predictive coding (55 per cent) and machine learning (48 per cent). In non-legal sectors, just 30 per cent, and 38 per cent of CIOs are doing the same thing, respectively.  

“IT staff in legal industries have a forward-thinking and well-reasoned attitude to artificial intelligence and automation technologies,” says Jamie Tyler, Head of Digital Transformation, CenturyLink. “They understand the impact and benefits that this technology can have, as well as its limitations, well ahead of their peers.”

More than three quarters (76 per cent) of CIOs in the legal industry believe AI will be able to work alone without supervision within the next ten years. Among their counterparts in other industries, just 60 per cent believe the same way.  Consequently, IT staff in the legal industry were more conscious about possible problems that might arise from the use of AI. 

Almost two thirds (62 per cent) fear errors that AI might cause, while almost half (49 per cent) said they feared AI creating irrelevant or poor results.  In the non-legal industries, just 34 per cent shared the same fears. 

“CIOs in the legal industry seem to have a more in-depth understanding of both the capabilities and limitations of predictive coding, machine learning and artificial intelligence systems compared to CIOs generally across all sectors.,” concludes Tyler. “They are well ahead of their peers and are approaching AI in a systematic, pragmatic fashion. This is validated by the fact that only 12 per cent of legal CIOs are worried about AI eventually taking over the planet, compared to 17 per cent of panicky CIOs in other industries.”

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