MIT researchers develop technology that allows routers to work together simultaneously

A team at MIT has developed MegaMIMO 2.0 which will allow multiple routers to work together to increase wireless speeds.

It is often the case today that there are multiple routers running simultaneously in homes and offices.  This situation leads to wireless interference where the routers are competing with one another to make use of shared frequencies to deliver data to devices.

Researchers at MIT have found a way to solve this problem and increase wireless speeds at the same time. A team at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, led by Dina Katabi, have developed a new technology that allows routers to work together called MegaMIMO 2.0.

The team will be providing more details on the technique they utilised to allow multiple routers to send data streams to a variety of devices in an upcoming research paper titled “Real-time Distributed MIMO Systems” that will be presented at next week's SIGCOMM in Brazil.

MIT graduate student and the lead author of the paper, Ezzeldin Hamed, offered some insight into the technology behind MegaMIMO 2.0: “In today's wireless world, you can't solve spectrum crunch by throwing more transmitters at the problem, because they will all still be interfering with one another. The answer is to have all those access points work with each other simultaneously to efficiently use the available spectrum.”

Currently this new technology requires custom hardware though it is neither bulky nor too outrageous. It will also soon be made commercialised which could take the form of integration with current routers or the creation of a brand new router that can take advantage of MegaMIMO 2.0.

The team at MIT also brought up the point that their technology could even be adapted for use with cellular networks though its implementation would be more difficult. 

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Anthony currently resides in South Korea where he teaches and experiences Korean technological advances first hand.