Public wants illegally collected data on them deleted

GCHQ and MI5 have been illegally collecting data on the UK public for a decade.

GCHQ and MI5 have been illegally collecting private data on UK citizens for a decade, the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT) recently ruled, which is something we reported on earlier this month. Now, the public has spoken and it wants that data deleted. Comparitech.com and OnePoll have polled 1,000 members of the UK public, and 70 per cent wants that data gone. This is something the IPT failed to stipulate in its ruling.  

For almost half (45 per cent), a compensation is in order, as well. The ruling has decreased the trust the UK public had in the government, and two thirds (68 per cent) also said it had lost trust in social media and email. Half (51 per cent) is more concerned about hackers stealing data, 14 per cent were most concerned with the government, and 31 per cent couldn't decide between the two. 

“While almost half of those surveyed said they should be compensated for any nefarious activity they may have been subjected to, a far healthier 70 per cen thought that the UK government should now delete all personal data it has acquired through illegal means,” said Lee Munson, security researcher for Comparitech.com. 

“Whether or not that happens remains to be seen – or not, as the case may be – but what is clear is that the British public still do not have a grasp on data privacy and wiretapping laws.” A thid (38 per cent) is willing to pay to increase their online privacy. There's a good business idea for you.   

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