Storage issues slowing digital transformation

SUSE says businesses are open to new ideas as they look to solve their storage problems.

New research claims storage woes are hampering digital transformation, and businesses are getting frustrated. This is according to open source software company SUSE, which says nine in ten UK businesses are worried about their storage issues. 

Besides storage hampering digital transformation, it’s limiting innovation and raising concerns about growing costs as capacity requirements increase.

Two thirds (66 per cent) of UK companies have had to review their approach to storage in the past year, as they grew frustrated with storage costs, performance and inability to support innovation.

For 91 per cent, growing storage costs and an increase in capacity requirements is also an issue. UK businesses are saying that their data grows 27 per cent each year-

The majority is not sticking to traditional solutions, though. Almost nine in ten (87 per cent) are open to new ideas like software-defined storage (SDS). 

“Reliance on technology today means every company is a data storage company,” said Danny Rowark, UK&I country manager at SUSE. “From emails and video to other memory-intensive data, businesses are not only archiving more data each year but are also required to house this data for years due to record retention policies and regulatory requirements. Concerns around data growth and its implications for data storage are at an all-time high. As a result, many UK organisations are now re-evaluating their approach to storage and looking for a different approach which can both support business innovation and keep business plans on track.”

Rowark continued: “With a steady stream of innovation coming from the open source community, enterprises are able to change their approach to ease cost and tackle implementation frustrations. Future-proofed solutions, such as open source approaches to software-defined storage, are proving very attractive to UK businesses worried about rising storage costs as capacity requirements increase.”

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