The UK plans to implement the EU's General Data Protection Plan post-Brexit

The Information Commissioner's Office is working on a revised timeline for how it will implement the EU's General Data Protection Plan following the UK's decision to leave the EU.

In the aftermath of Brexit, the Information Commissioner's Office is planning on releasing a revised timeline that will detail how the UK will adopt and implement the EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Information commissioner Elizabeth Denham is pleased with the government's decision to implement the GDPR and believes that it will be the best course of action for the country in terms of adopting better data protection policies. Denham further expressed her position on the subject in a blog post, writing: “I see this as good news for the UK. One of the key drivers for data protection change is the importance and continuing evolution of the digital economy in the UK and around the world.

“The digital economy is primarily built upon the collection and exchange of data, including large amounts of personal data – much of it sensitive.  Growth in the digital economy requires public confidence in the protection of this information.”

The GDPR will come into effect during 2018 and at that time, the UK will still be a part of the EU which means that adopting the new regulations and complying with them will need to take place before any discussion is had over how Brexit could affect them.

Secretary of state for culture, media and sport, Karen Bradley, was recently posed a question regarding Brexit during a select committee meeting in which she summed up the situation at hand, saying: “We will be members of the EU in 2018 and therefore it would be expected and quite normal for us to opt into the GDPR and then look later at how best we might be able to help British business with data protection while maintaining high levels of protection for members of the public.”

If the UK were to eschew the GDPR completely as a result of the recent referendum, than businesses in the country could be fined up to £122 billion in penalties for data breaches as soon as the new regulations come into effect in 2018. 

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Anthony currently resides in South Korea where he teaches and experiences Korean technological advances first hand.