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Xerox DocuMate 3125 review

Home OfficeReviews
7/10
by Tony Hoffman, 19 Jan 2013Reviews
Xerox DocuMate 3125 review

The Xerox DocuMate 3125 is a £350 duplexing desktop scanner with a 50-sheet automatic document feeder (ADF). It provides one-touch scanning from 9 preset and customisable scan profiles, either from your computer or the scanner itself. Though its OCR performance was reasonably good, particularly in grayscale mode, its scanning speeds were somewhat slow, especially for searchable PDF.

With a 285 by 165mm footprint, this Xerox model is reasonably compact and should easily fit on a desk; it weighs 2.3kg. It has a straight-through paper path, and can scan documents up to 8.5in wide and 38in long, and business cards as well as plastic cards up to 0.8mm thick. It has an ultrasonic double-feed detection sensor to catch paper misfeeds.

To the right of the ADF is a single-character LCD that's used to display the number of the current Visioneer OneTouch scan profile (as well as error messages) – you can switch between preset and customisable numbered scan profiles with up and down arrows.

Scanning

You can initiate scans directly from the scanner, by choosing a profile and hitting either the Simplex or Duplex button, or the OneTouch interface on your computer. You can also scan from the bundled programs (PaperPort and OmniPage); the 3125 includes Twain, WIA, and ISIS drivers, so you can also scan from nearly any program that has a scan command.

Like most document scanners, the 3125 can scan at up to 600 dpi; it can scan in black and white, greyscale, or colour. The default OneTouch scanning profiles and destinations include Scan (image PDF), PDF (searchable PDF), Print (BMP), E-mail (PDF), Fax (BMP), OCR (RTF), Archive (searchable PDF, 300 dpi), Business Card (BMP), and Paint (BMP). It can scan to PDF, searchable PDF, JPEG, TIFF, and BMP formats; it can also scan to RTF and other document formats if you install either the included Nuance PaperPort or OmniPage Pro 17.

Although the device can scan business cards, it doesn't have a business card management program, so if you want to use the 3125 for business card scanning and management, you'll have to supply your own software.

Speed

The DocuMate 3125 has a rated speed of 25 pages per minute (ppm) for simplex scanning and 44 images per minute (ipm) where each side of a page counts as one image. In speed testing using the OneTouch software’s default settings (image PDF, black and white, 200 dpi), the 3125 was a bit short of that, hitting 21.4 ppm simplex and 30 ipm for duplex.

To put that in perspective, the Canon imageFormula DR-C125, rated at 25 ppm and 50 ipm for simplex and duplex scanning, matched its rated speeds: We clocked it at 25.4 ppm simplex and 50 ipm duplex. The Kodak i2400, rated at 30 ppm simplex and 60 ipm duplex, tested at 28.3 ppm in simplex and 53 ipm in duplex.

The 3125 has two default searchable PDF scan destinations in OneTouch: PDF (200 ppi black and white) and Archive (300 dpi black and white) – the Image PDF setting is simply called Scan.

Its speed for scanning in simplex at 300 ppi (3 minutes and 28 seconds) was actually somewhat faster than at 200 ppi (3 minutes and 52 seconds), though that was reversed in duplex scanning, with it averaging 8 minutes and 8 seconds in simplex and 8 minutes and 22 seconds in duplex. When I switched to greyscale mode for 200 ppi simplex scanning, it was a bit faster, taking 3 minutes and 15 seconds. But regardless of the resolution and mode, it is sluggish for a scanner at its price and speed rating when it comes to scanning to searchable PDF.

Again, in comparison the Canon imageFormula DR-C125 didn't slow down at all when scanning to sPDF (searchable PDF) format, which is generally the preferred format for document management applications. We clocked the Canon at a minute flat in scanning our 25-page test document in both simplex and duplex modes. The Kodak i2400 took 1 minute and 34 seconds to scan our test document in simplex to searchable PDF.

OCR

In scanning to OCR using the default OneTouch OCR setting (black and white, 300 ppi RTF format), the DocuMate 3125’s quality was somewhat inconsistent. With our Arial test font, it was perfect at reading 5-point type, but had at least one error in several larger sizes up to 12 point. With Times New Roman it was perfect at 8 point, with 1 error in both 10 and 12 points.

I also tried scanning to OCR in greyscale mode (at 300 ppi), and here the device performed reasonably well. In Times New Roman, it was perfect down to 8 points, with a single mistake at 6 points. With the Arial font, although it read 8 point type perfectly, it had one mistake at 12 points, one at 10 points, and one at 6 points. It did a relatively good job with most of our nonstandard text fonts.

Verdict

The Xerox DocuMate 3125 is a reasonable choice for a desktop business scanner at its price, if you don't need to scan to searchable PDF format. It offers duplex scanning and a 50-sheet ADF. You can choose any of 9 programmable scan profiles using arrow buttons for one-touch scanning.

Its OCR performance is reasonably good, particularly in greyscale mode. The 3125 lacks a business card management program, so if you want to scan business cards with it, you should either already have such a program or be ready to buy one (and factor that into the overall cost).

The device’s scan speed at default settings was a bit below its rated speed, in both simplex and especially duplex. It slowed down greatly at scanning to searchable PDF, taking more than four times as long as the Canon DR-C125 for simplex scanning, and more than eight times as long for duplex. If you scan to searchable PDF, there are much faster choices than the Xerox DocuMate 3125, but otherwise it's a pretty typical scanner in its price bracket, though it doesn't offer anything to make it stand out from the pack.

Specifications

Manufacturer and Model

Xerox DocuMate 3125

Scanning Options

Reflective

Automatic Document Feeder

Yes

USB or FireWire Interface

USB

Maximum Optical Resolution

600 pixels

Ethernet Interface

No

Flatbed

No

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