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XML

The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a W3C-recommended general-purpose markup language for creating special-purpose markup languages, capable of describing many different kinds of data. In other words, XML is a way of describing data.

An XML file can contain the data too, as in a database. It is a simplified subset of Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML). Its primary purpose is to facilitate the sharing of data across different systems, particularly systems connected via the Internet. Languages based on XML (for example, Geography Markup Language (GML), RDF/XML, RSS, Atom, MathML, XHTML, SVG, XUL, MXML, EAD, Klip and MusicXML) are defined in a formal way, allowing programs to modify and validate documents in these languages without prior knowledge of their particular form.

Another view is that XML is a wide standard to encode structured information.

The Wikipedia entry for the term XML can be found here (opens in new tab).

Here is a 70minutes Video giving an insight on XML11, an extension of XML and an Abstract Windowing Protocol.

Désiré Athow
Contributor

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.