Skip to main content

SCO faces financial crunch after Unix defeat

SCO challenged IT giants IBM and Novell over the rights to the Unix operating system in a set of court cases which began in 2003. On 10th August the company lost its case against Novell when a court ruled that Novell and not SCO owned copyrights to the Unix system.

One month after the ruling the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, a US process in which the company is shielded from creditors while it reorganises itself. The company has now lodged a filing with financial regulator the Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) which casts doubt on the future of the company.

"As a result of both the Court's August 10, 2007, ruling and the Company's entry into Chapter 11, there is substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continue as a growing concern," said the filing.

The court ruling meant that SCO now owes royalty payments to Novell, rather than the other way round. Novell is seeking $30 million plus interest from SCO.

"If a significant cash payment is required, or significant assets are put under a constructive trust, the carrying amount of our long-lived assets may not be recovered," said SCO's filing.

When the company filed for bankruptcy protection last week, chief executive Darl McBride had said that customers will be able to rely on the firm.

"We want to assure our customers and partners that they can continue to rely on SCO products, support and services for their critical business operations," McBride said.

But in this week's filing, the firm explicitly recognised the possibility of its being unable to emerge from the bankruptcy process

"If we require additional financing during the Chapter 11 cases and we are unable to obtain the financing on favorable terms or at all, our chances of successfully reorganizing our businesses may be seriously jeopardized," it said.

To add to the company's financial worries, it has been told that it will be de-listed from the Nasdaq stock exchange as early as next week. It has asked for an appeal hearing, but it will have to present a Nasdaq committee with a viable business plan if it is to be given permission to stay on the exchange.

On the day that the US court announced its decision SCO shares began the day trading at $1.49, but this week those shares were languishing at 20 cents each.

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.