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Russia has Europe's fastest growing Internet population

Comscore has released its latest figures on how well Internet is doing in Europe.

The survey, which shows some pretty interesting figures showing that UK are the biggest Internet consumers.

However, the survey excludes traffic from public computers such as Internet cafes or access from mobile phones or PDAs and does not take into account web-savvy internet users aged 14 or less.

The European region recorded its largest ever Internet audience in September with a 5-percent year over year growth, reaching 226.7 million unique visitors age 15 or older.

Russia had the fastest growing online audience this period, increasing 23 percent to 14.6 million unique visitors, followed by Spain, which grew 18 percent to 14.5 million unique visitors, and Ireland, which grew 16 percent to 1.5 million.

The country with the largest online audience was Germany with 33.2 million unique visitors, followed closely by the U.K. with 32.2 million.

Together, they represented 29 percent of the total European online audience.

Europe's third largest online country, France, was also its fourth fastest growing, having enjoyed a 14-percent gain and reaching 27.3 million unique visitors in September.

The Nordic region also produced some of the most active online audiences in all of Europe. On average, Internet users in Sweden viewed more pages than any other European country - 3,844 pages per visitor. The country also spent the second longest average period of time on the Internet in September at 30.1 hours per visitor. Finland's online audience viewed the second most number of pages, averaging 3,266 pages per visitor.

The U.K. Internet audience spent the most time online at an average of 33.0 hours for the month. It also viewed the highest number of pages outside of the Nordic region, averaging 3,252 pages per visitor per month, slightly ahead of the Netherlands with 3,051.

Désiré Athow
Contributor

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.