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Microsoft confused over Vista Marketing

Recent filings (opens in new tab) for a lawsuit brought by a Vista user against Microsoft showed the extent to which marketing lingo can hazy.

According to PC World, lawyers prosecuting Microsoft called upon the company to provide more information about the Windows Vista Capable/Ready confusion.

In addition, Microsoft has also included a Windows Vista Premium Ready stickers further adding to the confusion.

Mark Croft, the company's director of marketing, argued that "Capable is a statement that has an interpretation for many that, in the context of this program, a PC would be able to run any version of the Windows Vista operating system, 'Ready' may have [prompted] concerns that the PC would run in some improved or better way than -- than 'Capable,' therefore the word capable was deemed to be a more fitting word for this program."

But then, according to documents seen by PC World, Mr Croft came back on his statement and modified it.

Microsoft has forcefully defended itself from the accusation that "Vista Capable" branding was applied to "soon-to-be-obsolete PCs that Microsoft knew lacked the horsepower to run the 'real' Vista."

Vista Capable Computers (opens in new tab) are only able to run the bare bone version of Vista which lacks Aero appearance, the Media Centre PC appearance, Flip-3D Windows switching and other features.

Désiré Athow
Contributor

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.