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Google to go for Wireless Spectrum?

The Wall Street Journal (opens in new tab) reports that Google will announce a bid for the famed 700MHz Wireless Spectrum later today.

The search company first expressed its intention to bid back in July (opens in new tab) and was rumoured at some point to look for partners; the value of the bid, around USD 4.6 billion, being one factor.

Back then, Google encouraged the FCC to encourage openness, something that was later adopted by Google itself as it launched the Open Handset Alliance.

The FCC also recently (opens in new tab) waived a previous regulation that would allow the winner to sell up to 100 percent of the so called D Block spectrum as long as it abides by a few other guidelines, including one which stipulates that the bidder should "build out a nationwide wireless network that is good enough to meet public safety specifications for coverage and redundancy."

This could have been the turning point that Google had been waiting as it gives the Search Engine the opportunity to bring in other partners.

Speaking of partners though, a potential bid might put some strain on the Open Handset Alliance as some of its members - like T-Mobile and Nextel - could become competitors to Google overnight.

As for consumers, well, if Google can produce the same kind of snowball effect as it did with Gmail, then it will be a great win-win situation.

Désiré Athow
Contributor

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.