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Fasthosts users still suffer from October hack

Fasthosts, a popular web services provider, has been forced to shut down many of its customers' websites after it was revealed that they did not change their passwords and login details to their FTP servers after a hack which took place back in October (opens in new tab).

A spokesperson for the Gloucester-based firm said "Last month, as a precautionary measure, we recommended all customers update their passwords. Fasthosts was made aware that a very small number of customers who did not change their passwords had experienced a compromise. 'As a result, Fasthosts implemented automatic password changes to every customer that did not change their Control Panel and FTP passwords as was previously recommended."

There have been reports that many of its customers (opens in new tab) did change the details back in October but were locked out of their systems nonetheless.

The firm has also published a press release saying "all unchanged email passwords automatically on Thursday 13 December. These affected customers will receive their new passwords by Royal Mail and have been informed of all these changes and what they are required to do."

Fasthosts has also confirmed (opens in new tab) that some website did suffer damage although it is unknown what would be the long term effect of the hack as Fasthosts has more than one million accounts.

Désiré Athow
Contributor

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.