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Sun plans to outsource ALL its data centres

Brian Cinque (opens in new tab), Sun Microsystems Data Centre Architect, has revealed that the Network Giant is looking to reduce its internal data centre usage to zero within 7 years.

“As SunIT reduces data centers due to higher utilization functionality, there will be a point proven by metrics, that SunIT can only become so efficient. At that point SunIT must progress from a “service oriented architecture” to more of a software as a service.” said Cinque.

By 2015, SunIT should have zero data centre presence according to the blog post written on the 10th of January.

Sun's CTO, John Dutra, however said that this was a vision rather than a tactical plan although he stressed that Sun is eager to reduce its in-house computing hardware usage.

By 2013, two years before the deadline, Sun plans to half the Data Centre square footage, total power consumption and the amount of BTU consumed.

The company plans to reduce the amount of data centres by using server virtualisation, storage and application consolidation, WAN acceleration and SaaS.

It is particularly interesting that a Fortune 500 company like Sun came forward with such a forceful statement, especially as it operates in an ultra competitive market.

By committing to this mantra - zero data centres within 7 years - Sun certainly wants to prove its point that this is doable even for a multi-billion company.

Which is a bold statement given that Sun Microsystems (opens in new tab) sells a substantial number of Data Centre Solutions.

Désiré Athow
Contributor

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.