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Google pours money in the WINE

Google is pumping money into Codeweavers (opens in new tab) to accelerate development of Wine, in a move that looks to undermine Microsoft's stranglehold on desktop-bound applications.

WiNE (opens in new tab), like another open source product, GNU, is a recursive acronym for Wine Is Not an Emulator and is a software application which allows Linux and other Unix-based operating systems to run programs originally destined for the Windows platform.

On Thursday 14th, Dan Kegel, Software Engineering Team and Wine 1.0 Release Manager announced on Google Code that Google had specifically hired Codeweavers to make Photoshop CS and CS2 work quicker under WINE; something that desktop Linux users have been demanding for quite some time.

The move might also prompt software giants like Adobe or Intuit to work on developing Wine-friendly rather than Linux only applications to garner a greater following; something that might freak out Microsoft.

One has to dig deep to understand the motivations behind this Google announcement as Google interns are also working hard on hundreds of WINE patches which will ensure that WIndows-based software work flawlessly on Linux computers.

APCmag.com (opens in new tab) understands that Microsoft might actually be looking to undermine Microsoft (and incidentally Apple as well) and distract it from the Web.

By creating a third alternative platform, the author reckons, Google possibly wants to send a clear message to Microsoft: Invade our turf and we will do the same on yours.

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.