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Google provides hints at how to avoid getting phished

Search Engine Giant, Google, has warned people about the threat that phishing emails pose as scammers try to con people into giving out sensitive information, while appearing from a genuine source.

Writing on Google' Security Team Blog (opens in new tab), Ian Fette commented ""Millions of people have gotten 'urgent' e-mails asking them to take immediate action to prevent some impending disaster. 'Our bank has a new security system. Update your information now or you won't be able to access your account,' or 'We couldn't verify your information; click here to update your account,'"

Google went on to describe five simple steps that casual users can follow in order to reduce the risk of Phishing taking place; most of which require common sense from a user's perspective and highlight the statement that humans are the weakest link in the security chain.

They include being wary of the "fabulous offers" and "fantastic prizes" that you'll sometimes come across on the web, use a recent browser that has a phishing filter, go directly to the site yourself, rather than clicking on links in suspicious emails and a few more.

To that Google might have added : Don't click on links in emails that have been categorised as spam and try to use web mails rather than desktop bound email client like Outlook Express which are more efficient at clearing out spam.

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.