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Freecom ToughDrive 2.5" 320GB USB-2 hard drive, £99.99 delivered

The ToughDrive Pro is quickly installed when you connect it to the USB 2.0 or FireWire port, and you don't even need to reboot your computer before using it.

This means you can start backing up documents, digital photos, videos and MP3 files straight away.

You can share files between computers and networks, and you can even lock your hard drive so no-one else can access it.

The ToughDrive Pro makes hardly any noise when it's working, because it has cooling technology that doesn't require a fan. It also has an internal anti-shock mechanism, so even if it falls from a height of
metres, all your data will still be safe and sound!

Technical Details
- Durable, soft silicone cover, ideal for mobile computing
- Internal anti-shock mechanism insulating the hard drive from shock
- Can withstand falling from 2 metres on a flat surface
- Integrated USB cable, no extra connection cables needed!
- USB-bus powered, no power adapter needed
- Winner of the RedDot 'best of the best' design award 2007
- The easiest way to add extra storage capacity to your computer
- Fast installation without rebooting
- High quality, slimline design, only 140 x 80 x 19 mm ( 5.5 x 3.15 x 0.74 inch)
- Fanless design thus no noise
- USB 2.0: as 320GB
- All Freecom devices meet the highest industry standards
- 2 years manufacturers warranty and unlimited helpdesk support

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.