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Samsung Unveils TouchWiz Interface SDK

Samsung Mobile has announced that they are all set to enter into the domains of App store by launching its new Mobile Widget SDK, in a bid to help developers create cool apps for its signature TouchWiz smartphones line up.

TouchWiz is a touch-supported user interface that is incorporated into some of the company’s high-end handsets, such as Memoir and Omnia, and it provides users with single-click access to the internet-based updates, including weather and stocks.

The new SDK for TouchWiz would be based on the Eclipse platform, which would even allow developers to create carrier-specific applications. This would give developers the flexibility to create high-profile apps by keeping the network operators in mind.

With the company’s ongoing Mobile Innovator program, developers would also get the opportunity to pitch their widgets straight to Samsung to get them preinstalled on the mobile phones in future.

Furthermore, the widgets can also be included via other channels, including the Samsung Widget Gallery as well as the company’s own App Store.

Discussing about the aforesaid program, the company’s senior VP Omar Khan said: “The Samsung Mobile Innovator program is a global program focused on giving developers the tools and the support that they need to develop and market widgets for Samsung's lineup of TouchWiz-based devices and applications for different Samsung phones”.

The new Samsung i8000 Omnia, which is slated to be available with Verizon Wireless sometime around later this year, will be the company’s first handset to have the Widget Gallery.

Samsung Mobile has announced that they are all set to enter into the domains of App store by launching its new Mobile Widget SDK, in a bid to help developers create cool apps for its signature TouchWiz smartphones line up.

TouchWiz is a touch-supported user interface that is incorporated into some of the company’s high-end handsets, such as Memoir and Omnia, and it provides users with single-click access to the internet-based updates, including weather and stocks.

The new SDK for TouchWiz would be based on the Eclipse platform, which would even allow developers to create carrier-specific applications. This would give developers the flexibility to create high-profile apps by keeping the network operators in mind.

With the company’s ongoing Mobile Innovator program, developers would also get the opportunity to pitch their widgets straight to Samsung to get them preinstalled on the mobile phones in future.

Furthermore, the widgets can also be included via other channels, including the Samsung Widget Gallery as well as the company’s own App Store.

Discussing about the aforesaid program, the company’s senior VP Omar Khan said: “The Samsung Mobile Innovator program is a global program focused on giving developers the tools and the support that they need to develop and market widgets for Samsung's lineup of TouchWiz-based devices and applications for different Samsung phones”.

The new Samsung i8000 Omnia, which is slated to be available with Verizon Wireless sometime around later this year, will be the company’s first handset to have the Widget Gallery.

Our Comments

Samsung is quietly trying establishing itself as a solid alternative to Nokia. The world's second largest mobile phone manufacturer has already launched Android-based mobile phones as well as smartphones based on its own operating system. Samsung has also launched its own version of Apple's app store.

Related Links

Samsung TouchWiz phones to get App Store (opens in new tab)

(Pocket-Lint)

Samsung opens up TouchWiz mobile widgets platform (opens in new tab)

(Mobile Entertainment)

Samsung launches TouchWiz Interface dev kit (opens in new tab)

(PhoneMag)

Samsung TouchWiz app store incoming (opens in new tab)

(Mirror.co.uk)

Samsung releases SDK for its TouchWiz phones (opens in new tab)

(CNet)

Samsung Offers TouchWiz SDK To Devs (opens in new tab)

(Information Week)

Désiré Athow
Désiré Athow

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.