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Google To Release Chrome OS Smartbook In 2010?

Google may have plans to release a Chrome-based, Google-branded smartbook (or netbook) - the legendary Google PC - after getting the Nexus One smartphone out of the way in January 2010.

According to Michael Arrington from Techcrunch (opens in new tab), Google has already submitted a request for proposal to a hardware manufacturer - which we believe would be Asus - with a list of "detailed technical specifications".

The device, Arrington says, ought to be ready for the 2010 holiday season - one year from now - and will be sold directly to the consumers in the US and presumably over here as well.

A 3G connections appears to be the only dead cert specifications at this point in time although we expect it to be an ARM-based model with a 10-inch screen with 16GB flash memory, a keyboard and all the functionality that you would find on the Nexus One. Maybe Google should call it Nexus Two.

Arrington reckons that the device might run on Nvidia's Tegra Line that currently powers Microsoft's Zune HD. The Tegra 2 is set to be launched next year and is said to be twice as powerful as the first one, thanks to a dual core configuration.

But knowing Google, it is likely that they might even want to tweak the processor their way as Apple often does with its Intel-based hardware. Unlike Apple however, Google is starting from afresh - without the legacy of the x86 platform - and is unlikely to stick with Intel.

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.