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Breaking : Google To Launch Cheaper, Stripped Down Nexus One?

Google may launch a more affordable version of its Nexus One smartphone with less features to attract users from emerging economies like India and Russia.

After an short interview (or editorial meeting) with the Managing Director of Google India (opens in new tab), Shailesh Rao and Gaurav Bhaskar (opens in new tab), Global Communications & Public Affairs Manager at Google India, Ankit Vengurlekar (opens in new tab), Anchor and Producer at CNBC TV In India, wrote on his Twitter (opens in new tab) account that "Nexus One will not come to India in its US avatar, the India specific Google Phone may be a stripped down version and priced lower!"

The original Nexus One phone is available in the US for $529 excluding delivery and value added Tax and it would be interesting to see whether Google keeps the same moniker, Nexus One, for that version or adopts a new one like Nexus One Micro (or mini, like the N97 Mini).

More interestingly, we'd be quite intrigued to know if the model will be launched in India only or whether it will be available to other more mature markets.

Based on previous "downsizing" exercises, one can expect that the prospective Nexus One Micro will have a smaller screen, less memory, a blander box and possibly a less capable processor.

(Thanks to Amit from Labnol for the headsup (opens in new tab))

Désiré Athow
Désiré Athow

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.