Skip to main content

FTSE 100 Companies Fail To Take Twitter Seriously Says Survey

Virgin Media Business carried out a survey that shows that only 16 percent of the top 100 companies listed on the FTSE 100 table use microblogging website Twitter to communicate with their customers regularly.

The study also pointed out to the fact that more than half have an account on Twitter but two thirds have failed to follow up with a clear commitment to the service. That could cost them dear, literally, as services or brands appear in around 1 in every 5 tweets that's roughly 13 million messages every day.

72 percent of those who signed up have never used their Twitter presence to reply to customer enquiries or comments about them which drew comparison with the process of opening a call centre and not answering any phone calls.

Phil Stewart, VMB's director of customer service, explains that “We have seen Twitter use skyrocket recently, and some five billion tweets have been posted since October alone; with so many people sharing their thoughts online, it's no surprise that many are talking about companies. Clearly this presents an excellent opportunity to engage with customers, but many are missing out.”

Our Comments

Maybe some of them should learn from the interaction between companies like O2 or even Virgin Media and their customers on Twitter to see how vibrant such a communication channel can be. Twitter is particularly effective when it comes to dishing out info to a lot of people at the same time.

Related Links

Twitter flies past its 10 billionth tweet (opens in new tab)

(Cnet)

Twitter hits 10 billionth tweet (opens in new tab)

(T3)

Twitter users celebrate 10 billion tweets (opens in new tab)

(Unthinkable)

Twitter hits 10 billion tweets (opens in new tab)

(Trustedreviews)

Twitter hits 10 Billion (opens in new tab)

(Reghardware)

Désiré Athow
Désiré Athow

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global tech-fests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. Previously he was a freelance technology journalist at Incisive Media, Breakthrough Publishing and Vnunet, and Business Magazine. He also launched and hosted the first Tech Radio Show on Radio Plus.